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dc.contributor.authorRiley-Smith, Tristram
dc.coverage.spatialPatan, Nepalen_GB
dc.coverage.temporal1980en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-05T10:14:37Z
dc.date.available2010-10-22T13:31:09Z
dc.date.issued1980-07-20
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/226718
dc.descriptionNaresh visits again this morning. More v interesting info learnt. I persuade him to chant one of the drum sequences he’s learnt, which I tape: called Deo Layagu it is to be played outside a shrine (as opposed to the longer “Chore” which is played on processions through the town). I try to quiz him on different sounds and their relation to different beats: “khin” and “kha” refer to striking the drum with a stick as held in the left hand; “Ta” = a slap with the right hand with fingers splayed open (on one point of drum face – Naresh can’t remember whether it’s at the centre or the side); while “NURRA” refers to a finger run (a 4-hit tattoo using index finger first through to little finger last).en_GB
dc.description.abstractA chant of a drum sequence called Deo Layagu.en_GB
dc.language.isootheren_GB
dc.publisherWorld Oral Literature Projecten_GB
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectDrummingen_GB
dc.subjectVocalised Drummingen_GB
dc.subjectNepalen_GB
dc.subjectNepaleseen_GB
dc.subjectPatanen_GB
dc.subjectBuddhisten_GB
dc.subjectOral Traditionen_GB
dc.subjectOral Literatureen_GB
dc.subjectLinguistic Anthropologyen_GB
dc.subjectNewarien_GB
dc.titleDrum Trainingen_GB
dc.typeAudioen_GB
dc.rights.generalCreative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unporteden_GB


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