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dc.contributor.authorZeitlyn, David
dc.date.accessioned2010-11-15T14:16:36Z
dc.date.available2010-11-15T14:16:36Z
dc.date.issued1990-01-30
dc.identifier.otherPhD.16046
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/226815
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/226815
dc.description.abstractThis work is an analysis of Mambila religion based on fieldwork in Somie village, Cameroon. An ethnographic and historical introduction to the Mambila is followed by an account of their religious concepts. It is argued that, despite their adherence to Christianity (and to Islam), traditional practices continue to be of great importance in everyday life. In order to examine traditional practice descriptions are given of divination and oath-taking rites. Translated transcripts of the different forms of the sua-oath form the empirical core of the thesis. The transcripts illustrate the way that Mambila experience and understand the meaning of sua. Descriptions are also given of the sua masquerades. Finally I examine problems inherent in the analysis of non-literate societies lacking a reflective tradition, and in particular, societies lacking precise, structured religious concepts. This allows for discussion of resulting implications on the relationships between religion, politics and `symbolic power. 'en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.titleMambila traditional religion : Sua in Somieen_GB
dc.typeThesisen_GB
dc.type.qualificationleveldoctoralen_GB
dc.type.qualificationnamePhDen_GB
dc.publisher.institutionUniversity of Cambridgeen_GB
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.16257


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