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dc.contributor.authorJansen, Jan
dc.date.accessioned2011-02-03T15:14:34Z
dc.date.available2011-02-03T15:14:34Z
dc.date.issued2010-12-10
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/229730
dc.descriptionWorld Oral Literature Project Workshop 2010en_GB
dc.description.abstractBased on observations during years of fieldwork in Manding dating back to 1988, this presentation analyses a recording of one person as a group or team performance. I will show how those not involved in the actual recording position themselves in order to have a claim on the recording. The argument is demonstrated with a video recording (of themes from the Sunjata epic, recited by a person officially inaugurated as the ‘Master of the Word’ of his family) made in Kela (Mali), January 2007, recently published as Volume 3 in the Verba Africana series. I argue that these ‘overlooked’ aspects are epistemological challenges to what academics generally present as oral tradition.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectoral literatureen_GB
dc.subjectMandingen_GB
dc.subjectSunjataen_GB
dc.subjectMalien_GB
dc.title‘Kumabali Ye Horon Di’ (The Person Who Doesn’t Speak Is Free): On the Social Construction of Copy Rightsen_GB
dc.typePresentationen_GB


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