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dc.contributor.authorPorsdam, Helle
dc.date.accessioned2013-05-31T10:15:25Z
dc.date.available2013-05-31T10:15:25Z
dc.date.issued2011
dc.identifier.urihttp://www.dspace.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/244642
dc.description.abstractEarly work in Digital Humanities (DH), was heavily influenced or even led by the technology. But with the second wave of DH, the visions and the initiatives are coming from within the humanities. The key words are qualitative, interpretive, experiential, emotive, and generative and digital toolkits are being developed and used in the service of the Humanities’ core methodological strengths: attention to complexity, medium specificity, historical context, analytical depth, critique and interpretation. The aims of the project are to: -Explain in clear, economical terms what the Digital Humanities (DH) are -Outline what the role(s) of DH are likely to be in teaching and research - Survey the likely impact(s) of DH on scholarly publishing - Identify and discuss what the main Intellectual Property issues are likely to be in relation to DH.en_GB
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was conducted as part of the Arcadia Programme, a three year programme funded by a grant from the Arcadia Fund.en_GB
dc.language.isoenen_GB
dc.subjectdigital humanitiesen_GB
dc.subjectreluctanceen_GB
dc.subjecthumanitiesen_GB
dc.subjectcopyrighten_GB
dc.titleToo much ‘digital’, too little ‘humanities’? An attempt to explain why many humanities scholars are reluctant converts to Digital Humanitiesen_GB
dc.typeWorking Paperen_GB
dc.type.versionnot applicableen_GB


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