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dc.contributor.authorLehmann, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2013-11-20T12:00:16Z
dc.date.available2013-11-20T12:00:16Z
dc.date.issued2013-10-25en
dc.identifier.citationInternational Sociology November 2013 vol. 28 no. 6, 645-662. DOI: 10.1177/0268580913503894en
dc.identifier.issn0268-5809
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/245068
dc.description.abstractThis article draws a distinction between religion as heritage and as belief, and also shows the complications which arise in predominantly Christian countries when ‘new arrivals’ and evangelical, Pentecostal, or conversion-led, movements claim the recognition which has historically been afforded to hegemonic churches. Using evidence from Europe, the USA and Brazil it reveals the uncertain implementation of the state–religion boundary in the law, in taxation and in politics, and shows how even the most secular states allow religious institutions special exemptions, albeit in different ways. It asks whether religion is not producing demands amounting to a separate citizenship and why religious expression should require privileged treatment additional to freedom of speech in a secular world where religious affiliation is regarded as a matter of personal choice. It also questions the assumption of market theories of religion that more and more intense religion is good for religion and good for society.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Arts and Humanities Research Council [grant number AH/F007566/1].
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSage Publishing
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/*
dc.subjectBrazilen
dc.subjectEuropeen
dc.subjectEvangelicalsen
dc.subjectneo-Pentecostalismen
dc.subjectReligious Regulationen
dc.subjectSecularismen
dc.subjectUSAen
dc.titleReligion as heritage, religion as belief: Shifting frontiers of secularism in Europe, the USA and Brazilen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted version of the article. The original publication of the Version of Record was in International Sociology November 2013 vol. 28 no. 6 645-662 and is available online at http://iss.sagepub.com/content/28/6/645.en
prism.endingPage662
prism.publicationDate2013en
prism.publicationNameInternational Sociologyen
prism.startingPage645
prism.volume28en
dc.rioxxterms.funderAHRC
dc.rioxxterms.projectidAH/F007566/1
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/0268580913503894en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-10-25en
dc.identifier.eissn1461-7242
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idESRC (RES-074-27-0002)


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Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution-NonCommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales