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dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Samantha Jen
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Michaelen
dc.date.accessioned2013-12-19T10:33:27Z
dc.date.available2013-12-19T10:33:27Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-16en
dc.identifier.citationLaw and Human Behavior (December 16)en
dc.identifier.issn0147-7307
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/245089
dc.description.abstractWe examined transcripts of forensic interviews with 115 children aged between 3 and 12 years, interviewed between 1 day and 18 months after allegedly experiencing a single incident of sexual abuse. Repeated questions were categorized with respect to the reasons why interviewers asked questions again, how interviewers asked repeated questions, and how children responded. On average, interviewers asked 3 repeated questions per interview. As age increased, the frequency of question repetition declined but there was no association between repetition and delay. Interviewers most often repeated questions for clarification (53.1%), but questions were also repeated frequently to challenge children’s previous responses (23.7%), and for no apparent reason (20.1%). In response, children typically repeated (54.1%) or elaborated on (31.5%) their previous answers; they contradicted themselves less often (10.8%). Questions repeated using suggestive prompts were more likely to elicit contradictions. There was no association between age or delay and the reasons why questions were repeated, how they were repeated, and how children responded. These findings emphasize the importance of training forensic interviewers to repeat questions only when the children or interviewers seek clarification and to encourage children who are anxious or reluctant to disclose. All repeated questions should be open-ended and interviewers should explain to children why questions are being repeated.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.titleThe Effects of Age and Delay on Responses to Repeated Questions in Forensic Interviews With Children Alleging Sexual Abuseen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted version of an article originally published in Law and Human Behavior (16 December). The version of record is available from the American Psychological Association at http://psycnet.apa.org/?&fa=main.doiLanding&doi=10.1037/lhb0000064.en
prism.publicationDate2013en
prism.publicationNameLaw and Human Behavioren
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/lhb0000064en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-12-16en
dc.contributor.orcidLamb, Michael [0000-0002-6792-3526]
dc.identifier.eissn1573-661X
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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