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dc.contributor.authorSavage, Jamesen
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Andrew Fen
dc.contributor.authorJohnstone, Rufusen
dc.date.accessioned2014-07-17T13:07:31Z
dc.date.available2014-07-17T13:07:31Z
dc.date.issued2012-11-21en
dc.identifier.citationJames L. Savage, Andrew F. Russell, and Rufus A. Johnstone "Maternal costs in offspring production affect investment rules in joint rearing" Behavioral Ecology first published online November 21, 2012 doi:10.1093/beheco/ars203en
dc.identifier.issn1045-2249
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/245537
dc.description.abstractWhen multiple individuals contribute to rearing the same offspring, conflict is expected to occur over the relative amounts invested by each carer. Existing models of biparental care suggest that this conflict should be resolved by partially compensating for changes by co-investors, but this has yet to be explicitly modeled in cooperative breeders over a range of carer numbers. In addition, existing models of biparental and cooperative care ignore potential variation in both the relative costs of offspring production to mothers and in maternal allocation decisions. If mothers experience particularly high costs during offspring production, this might be expected to affect their investment strategies during later offspring care. Here we show using a game-theoretical model that a range of investment tactics can result depending on the number of carers and the relative costs to the mother of the different stages within the breeding attempt. Additional carers result in no change in investment by individuals when production costs are low, as mothers can take advantage of the greater potential investment by increasing offspring number; however this tactic ultimately results in a decrease in care delivered to each offspring. Conversely, when production costs prevent the mother from increasing offspring number, our model predicts that other individuals should partially compensate for additional carers and hence offspring should each receive a greater amount of care. Our results reinforce the importance of considering investment across all stages in a breeding attempt, and provide some explanatory power for the variation in investment rules observed across cooperative species.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by a Natural Environment Research Council studentship to JLS, and by a Royal Society University Research Fellowship to AFR.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.rightsDSpace@Cambridge license
dc.subjectbi-parental careen
dc.subjectcooperative breedingen
dc.subjectgame theoryen
dc.subjectincomplete compensationen
dc.subjectmaternal effectsen
dc.subjectsealed-biden
dc.titleMaternal costs in offspring production affect investment rules in joint rearingen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version can be found on the publisher's website at: http://beheco.oxfordjournals.org/content/early/2012/11/20/beheco.ars203 © The Author 2012. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology. All rights reserved.en
prism.endingPage758
prism.publicationDate2012en
prism.publicationNameBehavioral Ecologyen
prism.startingPage750
prism.volume24en
dc.rioxxterms.funderNERC
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/beheco/ars203en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2012-11-21en
dc.contributor.orcidSavage, James [0000-0002-4737-5673]
dc.identifier.eissn1465-7279
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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