Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorFuller, SJen
dc.contributor.authorWragg, FPHen
dc.contributor.authorNutter, Jen
dc.contributor.authorKalberer, Markusen
dc.date.accessioned2014-08-04T10:29:19Z
dc.date.available2014-08-04T10:29:19Z
dc.date.issued2014-04-08en
dc.identifier.citationAtmospheric Environment 92, August 2014, Pages 97–103. DOI: 10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.04.006en
dc.identifier.issn1352-2310
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/245608
dc.description.abstractAtmospheric aerosol particle concentrations have been linked with a wide range of pulmonary and cardio-vascular diseases but the particle properties responsible for these negative health effects are largely unknown. It is often speculated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) present in atmospheric particles lead to oxidative stress in, and ultimately disease of, the human lung. The quantification of ROS is highly challenging because some ROS components such as radicals are highly reactive and therefore short-lived. Thus, fast analysis methods are likely advantageous over methods with a long delay between aerosol sampling and ROS analysis. We present for the first time a detailed comparison of conventional off-line and fast on-line methods to quantify ROS in organic aerosols. For this comparison a new and fast on-line instrument was built and characterized to quantify ROS in aerosol particles with high sensitivity and a limit of detection of 4 nmol H2O2 equivalents per m3 air. ROS concentrations are measured with a time resolution of approximately 15 min, which allows the tracking of fast changing atmospheric conditions. The comparison of the off-line and on-line method shows that, in oxidized organic model aerosol particles, the majority of ROS have a very short lifetime of a few minutes whereas a small fraction is stable for a day or longer. This indicates that off-line techniques, where there is often a delay of hours to days between particle collection and ROS analysis, may severely underestimate true ROS concentrations and that fast on-line techniques are necessary for a reliable ROS quantification in atmospheric aerosol particles and a meaningful correlation with health outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council (NE/H52449X/1), the Velux Stiftung (Project 593) and an ERC starting grant (grant no. 279405).
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.subjectOrganic aerosolen
dc.subjectHealth effectsen
dc.subjectOn-line analysisen
dc.titleComparison of on-line and off-line methods to quantify reactive oxygen species (ROS) in atmospheric aerosolsen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted manuscript version. The final published version is available from Elsevier at http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1352231014002787.en
prism.endingPage103
prism.publicationDate2014en
prism.publicationNameAtmospheric Environmenten
prism.startingPage97
prism.volume92en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.atmosenv.2014.04.006en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-04-08en
dc.contributor.orcidKalberer, Markus [0000-0001-8885-6556]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-2844
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (279405)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-04-08


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record