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dc.contributor.authorBrooke, Hannah Len
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, Andrewen
dc.contributor.authorCorder, Kirstenen
dc.contributor.authorEkelund, Ulfen
dc.contributor.authorVan Sluijs, Estheren
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-22T08:18:54Z
dc.date.available2014-10-22T08:18:54Z
dc.date.issued2014-10-16en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Science and Medicine in Sport 2016, 19(1): 29–34. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2014.10.003en
dc.identifier.issn1440-2440
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/246236
dc.description.abstractObjectives: Describe 1) time-segment specific changes in physical activity (PA) into adolescence, 2) differences in change in PA between specific time-segments (weekdays¬–weekends, in-school–out-of-school, out-of-school–weekends, lesson-time–lunch-time), 3) associations of change in time-segment specific with overall PA. Design: Longitudinal observational study (4-year follow-up) Method: Children from the SPEEDY study (n=769, 42% boys) had PA measured by accelerometer for at least three days at ages 10.2±0.3, 11.2±0.3 and 14.3±0.3 years. Changes in moderate-to-vigorous PA (ΔMVPA, minutes ≥2000 counts/minute [cpm]) and total PA (ΔTPA, average cpm) during weekdays, weekends, in-school, out-of-school, lesson-times and lunch-times, were tested using three level (age, individual, school) mixed-effects linear regression. Differences in ΔMVPA/ΔTPA between time-segments were tested using time-segment*age interaction terms. Associations of four-year time-segment specific ΔMVPA/ΔTPA with four-year overall ΔMVPA/ΔTPA were tested using two level (time-segment specific ΔMVPA/ΔTPA, school) mixed-effects linear regression. Results: MVPA and TPA declined in all time-segments, except lesson-time MVPA. Annual ΔMVPA and, for boys only, ΔTPA was greater on weekends than weekdays (Beta±SE for interaction term: boys, -3.53±0.83mins, -29.64±7.64cpm; girls, -2.20±0.64mins) and out-of-school (boys; -4.36±0.79mins, -19.36±8.46cpm, girls; -2.44±0.63mins). ΔMVPA and ΔTPA during lunch-time was greater than during lesson-time (boys -0.96±0.20mins, -36.43±6.55cpm; girls -0.90±0.13mins, -38.72±4.40cpm). ΔTPA was greater out-of-school than in-school (boys, -19.89±6.71cpm; girls, -18.46±6.51cpm). For all time-segments, four-year ΔMVPA/ΔTPA was positively associated with four-year overall ΔMVPA/ΔTPA (all p<0.042), except for girl’s in-school and lunch-time TPA. Conclusions: Interventions focused on PA maintenance could target all time-segments, but weekends and out-of-school may be particularly advantageous due to the relatively large declines observed.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe SPEEDY study is funded by the National Prevention Research Initiative (http://www.npri.org.uk), consisting of the following Funding Partners: British Heart Foundation; Cancer Research UK; Department of Health; Diabetes UK; Economic and Social Research Council; Medical Research Council; Health and Social Care Research and Development Office for the Northern Ireland; Chief Scientist Office, Scottish Government Health Directorates; Welsh Assembly Government and World Cancer Research Fund. This work was also supported by the Medical Research Council [Unit Programme numbers MC_UU_12015/7 and MC_UU_12015/4] and the Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), a UKCRC Public Health Research: Centre of Excellence. Funding from the British Heart Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council, Medical Research Council, the National Institute for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust, under the auspices of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration, is gratefully acknowledged.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectAdolescentsen
dc.subjectAccelerometryen
dc.subjectLongitudinal Studiesen
dc.subjectTime-segmentsen
dc.subjectPatternsen
dc.titleChanges in time-segment specific physical activity between ages 10 and 14 years: a longitudinal observational studyen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version. It is is available from Elsevier at http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jsams.2014.10.003en
prism.endingPage34
prism.publicationDate2014en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Science and Medicine in Sporten
prism.startingPage29
prism.volume19en
dc.rioxxterms.funderMRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderBHF
dc.rioxxterms.funderCRUK
dc.rioxxterms.funderESRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dc.rioxxterms.funderNIHR
dc.rioxxterms.projectidMC_UU_12015/7
dc.rioxxterms.projectidMC_UU_12015/4
dcterms.dateAccepted2014-10-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.jsams.2014.10.003en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-10-16en
dc.contributor.orcidAtkin, Andrew [0000-0002-3819-3448]
dc.contributor.orcidCorder, Kirsten [0000-0002-2744-3501]
dc.contributor.orcidVan Sluijs, Esther [0000-0001-9141-9082]
dc.identifier.eissn1878-1861
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/3)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/7)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/4)


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0