Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorGebauer, Jochen Een
dc.contributor.authorBleidorn, Wiebkeen
dc.contributor.authorGosling, Samuel Den
dc.contributor.authorRentfrow, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorLamb, Michaelen
dc.contributor.authorPotter, Jeffen
dc.date.accessioned2015-03-16T09:37:47Z
dc.date.available2015-03-16T09:37:47Z
dc.date.issued2014-12en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Personality and Social Psychology Vol 107(6), Dec 2014, 1064-1091. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/a0037683en
dc.identifier.issn0022-3514
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/247004
dc.description.abstractA socio-cultural motives perspective (SMP) on Big Five relationships is introduced. According to the SMP, Agreeableness and Conscientiousness elicit assimilation to socio-cultural norms, Openness elicits contrast from these norms, and Extraversion and Neuroticism are independent of socio-cultural assimilation and contrast. Due to socio-cultural assimilation, then, relationships of Agreeableness and Conscientiousness with an outcome will wax (become more positive or less negative) with that outcome’s increasing socio-cultural normativeness. Due to socio-cultural contrast, relationships of Openness with an outcome will wane (become less positive or more negative) with that outcome’s increasing socio-cultural normativeness. We tested the SMP using religiosity as our outcome. Study 1 included four cross-sectional self-report datasets across 66 countries (N = 1,129,334), 50 US states (N = 1,057,342), 15 German federal states (N = 20,885), and 121 British urban areas (N = 386,315). Study 2 utilized informant-report data across 37 countries (N = 544,512). Study 3 used longitudinal data across 15 German federal states (N = 14,858). Results consistently supported the SMP. Relationships of Agreeableness and Conscientiousness with religiosity were more positive in religious socio-cultural contexts, compared to secular contexts. Relationships of Openness with religiosity were more negative in religious socio-cultural contexts, compared to secular contexts. At a more general level, the SMP offers theory-driven explanations for cross-cultural variations in Big Five relationships with their outcomes.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thankfully acknowledge support from the German Research Foundation (DFG; GE 2515/3-1).
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Psychological Association
dc.subjectBig Five Relationshipsen
dc.subjectSocio-Cultural Normativenessen
dc.subjectSocio-Cultural Assimilationen
dc.subjectSocio-Cultural Contrasten
dc.subjectReligiosityen
dc.titleCross-Cultural Variations in Big Five Relationships with Religiosity: A Socio-Cultural Motives Perspectiveen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the accepted manuscript. This article may not exactly replicate the final version published in the APA journal. It is not the copy of record. The final version is available from APA at http://psycnet.apa.org/psycinfo/2014-35855-001/.en
prism.endingPage1091
prism.publicationDate2014en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Personality and Social Psychologyen
prism.startingPage1064
prism.volume107en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1037/a0037683en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2014-12en
dc.contributor.orcidRentfrow, Peter [0000-0002-9068-2118]
dc.contributor.orcidLamb, Michael [0000-0002-6792-3526]
dc.identifier.eissn1939-1315
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record