Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorEastmond, Peter Jen
dc.contributor.authorAstley, Holly Men
dc.contributor.authorParsley, Kateen
dc.contributor.authorAubry, Sylvainen
dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Ben Pen
dc.contributor.authorMenard, Guillaume Nen
dc.contributor.authorCraddock, Christian Pen
dc.contributor.authorNunes-Nesi, Adrianoen
dc.contributor.authorFernie, Alisdair Ren
dc.contributor.authorHibberd, Julianen
dc.date.accessioned2015-04-17T14:59:26Z
dc.date.available2015-04-17T14:59:26Z
dc.date.issued2015-04-10en
dc.identifier.citationNature Communications 6, Article number: 6659. DOI: 10.1038/ncomms7659en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/247390
dc.description.abstractGluconeogenesis is a fundamental metabolic process that allows organisms to make sugars from non-carbohydrate stores such as lipids and protein. In eukaryotes only one gluconeogenic route has been described from organic acid intermediates and this relies on the enzyme phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK). Here we show that two routes exist in Arabidopsis, and that the second uses pyruvate, orthophosphate dikinase (PPDK). Gluconeogenesis is critical to fuel the transition from seed to seedling. Arabidopsis pck1 and ppdk mutants are compromised in seed-storage reserve mobilization and seedling establishment. Radiolabelling studies show that PCK predominantly allows sugars to be made from dicarboxylic acids, which are products of lipid breakdown. However, PPDK also allows sugars to be made from pyruvate, which is a major product of protein breakdown. We propose that both routes have been evolutionarily conserved in plants because, while PCK expends less energy, PPDK is twice as efficient at recovering carbon from pyruvate.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe thank the Biotechnology and Biology Sciences Research Council for funding J.M.H. (P18931 and a studentship to B.P.W.) and P.J.E. (BB/G009724/1 and BB/K002147/1), the Isaac Newton Trust and the Max-Planck Gesellschaft for funding and ATC for a CASE studentship to H.M.A.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/*
dc.titleArabidopsis uses two gluconeogenic gateways for organic acids to fuel seedling establishmenten
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final published version. It first appeared at http://www.nature.com/ncomms/2015/150410/ncomms7659/full/ncomms7659.html.en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameNature Communicationsen
prism.volume6en
dc.rioxxterms.funderBBSRC
dc.rioxxterms.projectidP18931
dc.rioxxterms.projectidBB/G009724/1
dc.rioxxterms.projectidBB/K002147/1
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-02-17en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/ncomms7659en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-04-10en
dc.contributor.orcidHibberd, Julian [0000-0003-0662-7958]
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idBBSRC (BB/I002243/1)
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Commission (253189)
pubs.funder-project-idBBSRC (P19982)


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales