Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorKelly, CLen
dc.contributor.authorThomson, Ken
dc.contributor.authorWagner, APen
dc.contributor.authorWaters, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Aen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Sen
dc.contributor.authorHolland, AJen
dc.contributor.authorRedley, Men
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-26T14:37:35Z
dc.date.available2015-05-26T14:37:35Z
dc.date.issued2015-03-31en
dc.identifier.citationKelly et al Journal of Intellectual Disability Research Volume 59, Issue 9, pages 835–844, September 2015. DOI: 10.1111/jir.12193en
dc.identifier.issn0964-2633
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/247995
dc.description.abstractBackground This study aims to use 30-day readmission rates to investigate the presumption that men and women with learning disabilities (LDs, known internationally as intellectual disabilities) receive poorer quality hospital care than their non-disabled peers. Method A 12-month retrospective audit was conducted using Hospital Episode Statistics (HES) at a single acute hospital in the East of England. This identified all in-patient admissions; admissions where the person concerned was recognised as having a LD; and all emergency readmissions within 30 days of discharge. Additionally, the healthcare records of all patients identified as having a LD and readmitted within 30 days as a medical emergency were examined in order to determine whether or not these readmissions were potentially preventable. Results Over the study period, a total of 66 870 adults were admitted as in-patients, among whom 7408 were readmitted as medical emergencies within 30 days of discharge: a readmission rate of 11%. Of these 66 870 patients, 256 were identified as having a LD, with 32 of them experiencing at least one emergency readmission within 30 days: a readmission rate of 13%. When examined, the healthcare records pertaining to these 32 patients who had a total of 39 unique 30-day readmissions revealed that 69% (n = 26) of these readmissions were potentially preventable. Conclusion Although overall readmission rates were similar for patients with LDs and those from the general population, patients with LDs had a much higher rate of potentially preventable readmissions when compared to a general population estimate from van Walraven et al. This suggests that there is still work to be done to ensure that this patient population receives hospital care that is both safe and of high quality.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by a grant from the Addenbrooke's Charitable Trust (CK), while the preparation of this paper was funded by the Health Foundation (AH, MR) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Collaboration for Leadership in Applied Health Research and Care East of England (AH, MR, AW) at Cambridgeshire and Peterborough NHS Foundation Trust.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectemergency readmissionsen
dc.subjecthospital admissionsen
dc.subjectHospital Episode Statistics (HES)en
dc.subjectintellectual disabilitiesen
dc.subjectlearning disabilitiesen
dc.subjectquality of careen
dc.titleInvestigating the widely held belief that men and women with learning disabilities receive poor quality healthcare when admitted to hospital: a single-site study of 30-day readmission ratesen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Wiley via http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jir.12193en
prism.endingPage844
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Intellectual Disability Researchen
prism.startingPage835
prism.volume59en
dc.rioxxterms.funderNIHR
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-02-25en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/jir.12193en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-03-31en
dc.identifier.eissn1365-2788
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-03-31


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record