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dc.contributor.authorAkbari, Omar Sen
dc.contributor.authorBellen, Hugo Jen
dc.contributor.authorBier, Ethanen
dc.contributor.authorBullock, Simon Len
dc.contributor.authorBurt, Austinen
dc.contributor.authorChurch, George Men
dc.contributor.authorCook, Kevin Ren
dc.contributor.authorDuchek, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorEdwards, Owain Ren
dc.contributor.authorEsvelt, Kevin Men
dc.contributor.authorGantz, Valentino Men
dc.contributor.authorGolic, Kent Gen
dc.contributor.authorGratz, Scott Jen
dc.contributor.authorHarrison, Melissa Men
dc.contributor.authorHayes, Keith Ren
dc.contributor.authorJames, Anthony Aen
dc.contributor.authorKaufman, Thomas Cen
dc.contributor.authorKnoblich, Juergenen
dc.contributor.authorMalik, Harmit Sen
dc.contributor.authorMatthews, Kathy Aen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor-Giles, Kate Men
dc.contributor.authorParks, Annette Len
dc.contributor.authorPerrimon, Norberten
dc.contributor.authorPort, Fillipen
dc.contributor.authorRussell, Steveen
dc.contributor.authorUeda, Ryuen
dc.contributor.authorWildonger, Jillen
dc.date.accessioned2015-09-16T10:26:14Z
dc.date.available2015-09-16T10:26:14Z
dc.date.issued2015-08-28en
dc.identifier.citationScience 2015, 349(6251), 927-929. doi: 10.1126/science.aac7932en
dc.identifier.issn0036-8075
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/250587
dc.description.abstractGene drive systems promote the spread of genetic elements through populations by assuring they are inherited more often than Mendelian segregation would predict (see the figure). Natural examples of gene drive from Drosophila include sex-ratio meiotic drive, segregation distortion, and replicative transposition. Synthetic drive systems based on selective embryonic lethality or homing endonucleases have been described previously in Drosophila melanogaster (1–3), but they are difficult to build or are limited to transgenic populations. In contrast, RNAguided gene drives based on the CRISPR/Cas9 nuclease can, in principle, be constructed by any laboratory capable of making transgenic organisms (4). They have tremendous potential to address global problems in health, agriculture, and conservation, but their capacity to alter wild populations outside the laboratory demands caution (4–7). Just as researchers working with self-propagating pathogens must ensure that these agents do not escape to the outside world, scientists working in the laboratory with gene drive constructs are responsible for keeping them confined (4, 6, 7).
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAAAS
dc.titleSafeguarding gene drive experiments in the laboratoryen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from AAAS via http://dx.doi.org/10.1126/science.aac7932en
prism.endingPage929
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameScienceen
prism.startingPage927
prism.volume349en
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-07-30en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1126/science.aac7932en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-08-28en
dc.contributor.orcidRussell, Steve [0000-0003-0546-3031]
dc.identifier.eissn1095-9203
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idBill & Melinda Gates Foundation (via Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH)) (via Imperial College London) (LBEE P58006)
pubs.funder-project-idImperial College London (1221)
pubs.funder-project-idBill & Melinda Gates Foundation (via Foundation for the National Institutes of Health (FNIH)) (via Imperial College London) (LBEE P41643)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-01-30


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