Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorMurray, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorBelin-Rauscent, Audeen
dc.contributor.authorSimon, Marineen
dc.contributor.authorGiuliano, Chiaraen
dc.contributor.authorBenoit-Marand, Marianneen
dc.contributor.authorEveritt, Barryen
dc.contributor.authorBelin, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-07T17:02:18Z
dc.date.available2015-10-07T17:02:18Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-14en
dc.identifier.citationNature Communications 2015, 5: 10088. doi:10.1038/ncomms10088en
dc.identifier.issn2041-1723
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/251367
dc.description.abstractIn the development of addiction, drug seeking becomes habitual and controlled by drug-associated cues, and the neural locus of control over behaviour shifts from the ventral to the dorsolateral striatum. The neural mechanisms underlying this functional transition from recreational drug use to drug seeking habits are unknown. Here we combined functional disconnections and electrophysiological recordings of the amygdalo-striatal networks in rats trained to seek cocaine to demonstrate that functional shifts within the striatum are driven by transitions from the basolateral (BLA) to the central (CeN) amygdala. Thus, while the recruitment of dorsolateral striatum dopamine-dependent control over cocaine seeking is triggered by the BLA, its long-term maintenance depends instead upon the CeN. These data demonstrate that limbic cortical areas both tune the function of cognitive territories of the striatum and thereby underpin maladaptive cocaine seeking habits.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Fondation pour la Recherche Médicale (FRM), the United Kingdom Medical Research Council (MRC) Grant 9536855 to BJE, the AXA research fund to ABR, an INSERM Avenir and an Agence Nationale de la Recherche (ANR) grant ANR12 SAMA00201 to DB. Research was conducted within both the MRC/Wellcome Trust Behavioral and Clinical Neuroscience Institute of Cambridge and the Inserm team “Psychobiology of Compulsive Disorders”, University of Poitiers.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNPG
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleBasolateral and central amygdala differentially recruit and maintain dorsolateral striatum-dependent cocaine-seeking habitsen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It was first available from NPG via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/ncomms10088en
prism.number10088en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameNature Communicationsen
prism.volume5en
dc.rioxxterms.funderMRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-03en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/ncomms10088en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-14en
dc.contributor.orcidEveritt, Barry [0000-0003-4431-6536]
dc.contributor.orcidBelin, David [0000-0002-7383-372X]
dc.identifier.eissn2041-1723
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1002231)
pubs.funder-project-idMEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (G0001354)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1000183)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (093875/Z/10/Z)


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License