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dc.contributor.authorChami, Goyletteen
dc.contributor.authorFenwick, Alanen
dc.contributor.authorBulte, Erwinen
dc.contributor.authorKontoleon, Andreasen
dc.contributor.authorKabatereine, Narcis Ben
dc.contributor.authorTukahebwa, Edridah Men
dc.contributor.authorDunne, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2015-10-13T09:57:12Z
dc.date.available2015-10-13T09:57:12Z
dc.date.issued2015-10-29en
dc.identifier.citationPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases 2015, 9(10): e0004193. doi:10.1371/journal.pntd.0004193en
dc.identifier.issn1935-2727
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/251404
dc.description.abstractBackground: The association of anaemia with intestinal schistosomiasis and hookworm infections are poorly explored in populations that are not limited to children or pregnant women. Methods: We sampled 1,832 individuals aged 5–90 years from 30 communities in Mayuge District, Uganda. Demographic, village, and parasitological data were collected. Infection risk factors were compared in ordinal logistic regressions. Anaemia and infection intensities were analyzed in multilevel models, and population attributable fractions were estimated. Findings: Household and village-level predictors of Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm were opposite in direction or significant for single infections. S. mansoni was found primarily in children, whereas hookworm was prevalent amongst the elderly. Anaemia was more prevalent in individuals with S. mansoni and increased by 2.86 fold (p-value<0.001) with heavy S. mansoni infection intensity. Individuals with heavy hookworm were 1.65 times (p-value = 0.008) more likely to have anaemia than uninfected participants. Amongst individuals with heavy S. mansoni infection intensity, 32.0% (p-value<0.001) of anaemia could be attributed to S. mansoni. For people with heavy hookworm infections, 23.7% (p-value = 0.002) of anaemia could be attributed to hookworm. A greater fraction of anaemia (24.9%, p-value = 0.002) was attributable to heavy hookworm infections in adults (excluding pregnant women) as opposed to heavy hookworm infections in school-aged children and pregnant women (20.2%, p-value = 0.001). Conclusion: Community-based surveys captured anaemia in children and adults affected by S. mansoni and hookworm infections. For areas endemic with schistosomiasis or hookworm infections, WHO guidelines should include adults for treatment in helminth control programmes.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLoS
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectSchistosomiasisen
dc.subjecthookwormen
dc.subjectsoil-transmitted helminthsen
dc.subjectanaemiaen
dc.subjectUgandaen
dc.subjectAfricaen
dc.subjectmass drug administrationen
dc.titleInfluence of Schistosoma mansoni and hookworm infection intensities on anaemia in Ugandan villagesen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from PLoS via http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pntd.0004193en
prism.numbere0004193en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNamePLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
prism.volume9en
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-10-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pntd.0004193en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-10-29en
dc.contributor.orcidKontoleon, Andreas [0000-0003-4769-898X]
dc.contributor.orcidDunne, David [0000-0002-8940-9886]
dc.identifier.eissn1935-2735
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (083931/Z/07/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idIsaac Newton Trust (MINUTE 1540(v))
pubs.funder-project-idImperial College London ()


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Creative Commons Attribution 4.0
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Creative Commons Attribution 4.0