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dc.contributor.authorCovshoff, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Thomas Een
dc.contributor.authorSmith-Unna, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorKelly, Stevenen
dc.contributor.authorSzecowka, Mareken
dc.contributor.authorBailey, Karen Jen
dc.contributor.authorSage, Tammy Len
dc.contributor.authorPachebat, Justin Aen
dc.contributor.authorLeegood, Richard Cen
dc.contributor.authorHibberd, Julianen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-05T14:09:24Z
dc.date.available2015-11-05T14:09:24Z
dc.date.issued2015-11-02en
dc.identifier.citationPlant Physiology 2015, 170(1): 57-73. doi:10.​1104/​pp.​15.​00889en
dc.identifier.issn0032-0889
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/252535
dc.description.abstractThe C₄ pathway is a highly complex trait that increases photosynthetic efficiency in over sixty plant lineages. Although the majority of C₄ plants occupy disturbed, arid and nutrient-poor habitats, some grow in high-nutrient, waterlogged conditions. One such example is Echinochloa glabrescens, which is an aggressive weed of rice paddies. We generated comprehensive transcriptome datasets for C₄ E. glabrescens and C₃ rice to identify genes associated with adaption to waterlogged, nutrient-replete conditions, but also used the data to better understand how C₄ photosynthesis operates in these conditions. Leaves of E. glabrescens exhibited classical Kranz anatomy with lightly lobed mesophyll cells having low chloroplast coverage. As with rice and other hygrophytic C₃ species, leaves of E. glabrescens accumulated a chloroplastic phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase protein, albeit at reduced amounts relative to rice. The arid-grown species Setaria italica (C₄) and Brachypodium distachyon (C₃) were also found to accumulate chloroplastic PEPC. We identified a molecular signature associated with C₄ photosynthesis in nutrient-replete, waterlogged conditions that is highly similar to those previously reported from C₄ plants that grow in more arid conditions. We also identified a cohort of genes that have been subjected to a selective sweep associated with growth in paddy conditions. Overall, this approach highlights the value of using wild species such as weeds to identify adaptions to specific conditions associated with high-yielding crops in agriculture.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists
dc.titleC₄ photosynthesis in the rice paddy: insights from the noxious weed Echinochloa glabrescensen
dc.title.alternativeTranscriptomics of C₄ photosynthesis in rice paddyen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from the American Society of Plant Biologists via http://dx.doi.org/​10.​1104/​pp.​15.​00889en
prism.endingPage73
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNamePlant Physiologyen
prism.startingPage57
prism.volume170en
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-02en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1104/pp.15.00889en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-11-02en
dc.contributor.orcidHibberd, Julian [0000-0003-0662-7958]
dc.identifier.eissn1532-2548
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idBBSRC (BB/I024445/1)
pubs.funder-project-idBill & Melinda Gates Foundation (via International Rice Research Institute (IRRI)) (unknown)


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