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dc.contributor.authorAndrews, Samantha J.
dc.contributor.authorAhern, Elizabeth C.
dc.contributor.authorStolzenberg, Stacia N.
dc.contributor.authorLyon, Thomas D.
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-09T16:39:20Z
dc.date.available2015-11-09T16:39:20Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-22
dc.identifier.citationAndrews et al. Applied Cognitive Psychology (2016). doi: 10.1002/acp.3204en
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/252565
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Wiley via http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/acp.3204en
dc.description.abstractWh- prompts (what, how, why, who, when, where) vary widely in their specificity and accuracy, but differences among them have largely been ignored in research examining the productivity of different question-types in child testimony. We examined 120 6- to 12-year-olds’ criminal court testimony in child sexual abuse cases to compare the productivity of various wh- prompts. We distinguished among what/how prompts, most notably: what/how-happen prompts focusing generally on events, what/how-dynamic prompts focusing on actions or unfolding processes/events, what/how-causality prompts focusing on causes and reasons, and what/how-static prompts focusing on non-action contextual information regarding location, objects, and time. Consistent with predictions, what/how-happen prompts were the most productive, and both what/how-dynamic prompts and wh- prompts about causality were more productive than other wh- prompts. Prosecutors asked proportionally more what/how-dynamic prompts and fewer what/how-static prompts than defense attorneys. Future research and interviewer training may benefit from finer discrimination among wh- prompts.en
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported in part by NICHD Grant HD047290 to Thomas D. Lyon and an ESRC studentship to Samantha J. Andrews.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectwh- promptsen
dc.subjectdirective questionsen
dc.subjectchild sexual abuseen
dc.subjectdefense cross-examinationen
dc.subjectprosecution direct-examinationen
dc.titleThe productivity of wh- prompts when children testifyen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.type.versionaccepted versionen
prism.publicationDate2016
prism.publicationNameApplied Cognitive Psychology
pubs.declined2017-10-11T13:54:37.619+0100
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/acp.3204
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-01-22


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