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dc.contributor.authorDavidenko, Nataliaen
dc.contributor.authorBax, Daniel Ben
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, Carlos Fen
dc.contributor.authorFarndale, Richarden
dc.contributor.authorHamaia, Samiren
dc.contributor.authorBest, Serenaen
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Ruthen
dc.date.accessioned2015-11-16T17:23:29Z
dc.date.available2015-11-16T17:23:29Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-16en
dc.identifier.citationJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine 2016 27: 14. doi:10.1007/s10856-015-5627-8en
dc.identifier.issn0957-4530
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/252632
dc.description.abstractShort wavelength (λ=254nm) UV irradiation was evaluated over a range of intensities (0.06 to 0.96 J/cm2) as a means of cross-linking collagen- and gelatin-based scaffolds, to tailor their material characteristics whilst retaining biological functionality. Zero-link carbodiimide treatments are commonly applied to collagen-based materials, forming cross-links from carboxylate anions (for example the acidic E of GFOGER) that are an essential part of integrin binding sites on collagen. Cross-linking these amino acids therefore disrupts the bioactivity of collagen. In contrast, UV irradiation forms bonds from less important aromatic tyrosine and phenylalanine residues. We therefore hypothesised that UV cross-linking would not compromise collagen cell reactivity. Here, highly porous (~99%) isotropic, collagen-based scaffolds were produced via ice-templating. A series of scaffolds (pore diameters ranging from 130-260μm) with ascending stability in water was made from gelatin, two different sources of collagen I, or blends of these materials. Glucose, known to aid UV crosslinking of collagen, was added to some lower-stability formulations. These scaffolds were exposed to different doses of UV irradiation, and the scaffold morphology, dissolution stability in water, resistance to compression and cell reactivity was assessed. Stabilisation in aqueous media varied with both the nature of the collagen-based material employed and the UV intensity. Scaffolds made from the most stable materials showed the greatest stability after irradiation, although the levels of cross-linking in all cases were relatively low. Scaffolds made from pure collagen from the two different sources showed different optimum levels of irradiation, suggesting altered balance between stabilisation from cross-linking and destabilisation from denaturation. The introduction of glucose into the scaffold enhanced the efficacy of UV cross-linking. Finally, as hypothesized, cell attachment, spreading and proliferation on collagen materials were unaffected by UV cross-linking. UV irradiation may therefore be used to provide relatively low level cross-linking of collagen without loss of biological functionality.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to thank the British Heart Foundation (Grants NH/11/1/28922 and RG/15/4/31268), The Welcome Trust (Grant 094470/Z/10/Z), the ERC Advanced Grant 320598 3D-E and EPSRC Doctoral Training Account for providing financial support for this project. D. V. Bax is funded by the Peoples Programme of the EU 7th Framework Programme (RAE no: PIIF-GA-2013-624904) and also supported by an EPSRC IKC Proof of Concept Award.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsCreative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjecttissue engineeringen
dc.subjectscaffoldsen
dc.subjectcollagenen
dc.subjectgelatinen
dc.subjectUV crosslinkingen
dc.titleOptimisation of UV Irradiation as a Binding Site Conserving Method for Crosslinking Collagen-based Scaffoldsen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It was first available from Springer via http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-015-5627-8en
prism.number14en
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicineen
prism.volume27en
dc.rioxxterms.funderBHF
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dc.rioxxterms.funderERC
dc.rioxxterms.funderEPSRC
dc.rioxxterms.projectidNH/11/1/28922
dc.rioxxterms.projectidRG/15/4/31268
dc.rioxxterms.projectid094470/Z/10/Z
dc.rioxxterms.projectid320598 3D-E
datacite.cites.urlhttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/252595
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-11en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s10856-015-5627-8en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-16en
dc.contributor.orcidFarndale, Richard [0000-0001-6130-8808]
dc.contributor.orcidBest, Serena [0000-0001-7866-8607]
dc.contributor.orcidCameron, Ruth [0000-0003-1573-4923]
dc.identifier.eissn1573-4838
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idBritish Heart Foundation (NH/11/1/28922)
pubs.funder-project-idEuropean Research Council (320598)
pubs.funder-project-idEPSRC (via University of Leeds) (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (094470/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idBritish Heart Foundation (RG/15/4/31268)


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