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dc.contributor.authorBrooke, Christopher
dc.date.accessioned2015-12-21T15:15:56Z
dc.date.available2015-12-21T15:15:56Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.citationIsaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment 2016.en
dc.identifier.isbn9780198783930
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253078
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Oxford University Press via https://doi.org/10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198783930.003.0007en
dc.description.abstractIt is obvious that Isaiah Berlin did not like Jean-Jacques Rousseau, and it is not difficult to think of some possible reasons. But I want to begin this chapter by suggesting that we can choose to be puzzled by this dislike of Rousseau perhaps a bit more than we usually are. Jeremy Waldron elsewhere in this collection discusses Berlin’s neglect of what he calls ‘Enlightenment constitutionalism’, focusing on the ways in which he seemed to lack interest in the hard work of designing a constitutional order in which self-interested, not always virtuous, ambitious men might live together in peace, prosperity, and freedom...
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Pressen
dc.titleIsaiah Berlin and the Origins of the ‘Totalitarian’ Rousseauen
dc.typeBook or Book Chapteren
dc.type.versionaccepted versionen
prism.publicationDate2016
prism.publicationNameIsaiah Berlin and the Enlightenment
prism.sectionPart II: Chapter 6
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198783930.003.0007
rioxxterms.versionAM


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