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dc.contributor.authorGillian, Claire Men
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevoren
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorvan, den Heuvel Odile Aen
dc.contributor.authorvan, Wingen Guidoen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-06T16:54:49Z
dc.date.available2016-01-06T16:54:49Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-29en
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Neuropsychopharmacology 2016. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.12.033en
dc.identifier.issn0924-977X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253114
dc.description.abstractCompulsivity has been recently characterized as a manifestation of an imbalance between the brain’s goal-directed and habit-learning systems. Habits are perhaps the most fundamental building block of animal learning, and it is therefore unsurprising that there are multiple ways in which the development and execution of habits can be promoted/discouraged. Delineating these neurocognitive routes may be critical to understanding if and how habits contribute to the many faces of compulsivity observed across a range of psychiatric disorders. In this review, we distinguish the contribution of excessive stimulus-response habit learning from that of deficient goal-directed control over action and response inhibition, and discuss the role of stress and anxiety as likely contributors to the transition from goal-directed action to habit. To this end, behavioural, pharmacological, neurobiological and clinical evidence are synthesized and a hypothesis is formulated to capture how habits fit into a model of compulsivity as a trans-diagnostic psychiatric trait.
dc.description.sponsorshipCM Gillan is supported by a Sir Henry Wellcome Postdoctoral Fellowship (101521/Z/12/Z).
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectCompulsivityen
dc.subjectHabiten
dc.subjectGoal-directeden
dc.subjectOCDen
dc.subjectLearningen
dc.titleThe role of habit in compulsivityen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It was first available from Elsevier via https://doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.12.033en
prism.endingPage840
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameEuropean Neuropsychopharmacologyen
prism.startingPage828
prism.volume26en
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dc.rioxxterms.projectid101521/Z/12/Z
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-20en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.12.033en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-29en
dc.contributor.orcidRobbins, Trevor [0000-0003-0642-5977]
dc.contributor.orcidSahakian, Barbara [0000-0001-7352-1745]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7862
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (093875/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (101521/Z/13/Z)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:55:28 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International