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dc.contributor.authorvan, de Vyver Julieen
dc.contributor.authorHouston, Diane Men
dc.contributor.authorAbrams, Dominicen
dc.contributor.authorVasiljevic, Milicaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-07T15:30:41Z
dc.date.available2016-01-07T15:30:41Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-16en
dc.identifier.citationvan de Vyver et al. Psychological Science (2015) Vol. 27, Issue 2, pp. 169-177. doi:10.1177/0956797615615584en
dc.identifier.issn0956-7976
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253147
dc.description.abstractMajor terrorist events, such as the recent attacks in Ankara, Sinai, and Paris, can have profound effects on a nation’s values, attitudes, and prejudices. Yet psychological evidence testing the impact of such events via data collected immediately before and after an attack is understandably rare. In the present research, we tested the independent and joint effects of threat (the July 7, 2005, London bombings) and political ideology on endorsement of moral foundations and prejudices among two nationally representative samples (combined N = 2,031) about 6 weeks before and 1 month after the London bombings. After the bombings, there was greater endorsement of the in-group foundation, lower endorsement of the fairness-reciprocity foundation, and stronger prejudices toward Muslims and immigrants. The differences in both the endorsement of the foundations and the prejudices were larger among people with a liberal orientation than among those with a conservative orientation. Furthermore, the changes in endorsement of moral foundations among liberals explained their increases in prejudice. The results highlight the value of psychological theory and research for understanding societal changes in attitudes and prejudices after major terrorist events.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are grateful to Age UK, the United Kingdom Equality and Human Rights Commission, NatCen Social Research, Amy Cuddy, Susan Fiske, and colleagues at the Centre for the Study of Group Processes for contributions to discussions and consultation in the preparation for the research.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial 2.0 UK: England & Wales
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/2.0/uk/
dc.subjectthreaten
dc.subjectterrorismen
dc.subjectmoralityen
dc.subjectprejudiceen
dc.titleBoosting Belligerence: How the July 7, 2005, London Bombings Affected Liberals’ Moral Foundations and Prejudiceen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from SAGE via http://dx.doi.org/10.1177/0956797615615584.en
prism.endingPage177
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNamePsychological Scienceen
prism.startingPage169
prism.volume27en
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-10-12en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/0956797615615584en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-16en
dc.contributor.orcidVasiljevic, Milica [0000-0001-7454-7744]
dc.identifier.eissn1467-9280
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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