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dc.contributor.authorYao, Boen
dc.contributor.authorVasiljevic, Milicaen
dc.contributor.authorWeick, Marioen
dc.contributor.authorSereno, Margaret Een
dc.contributor.authorO'Donnell, Patrick Jen
dc.contributor.authorSereno, Sara Cen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-07T16:14:47Z
dc.date.available2016-01-07T16:14:47Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-25en
dc.identifier.citationPLOS ONE 2013, 8(9): e75000. doi:10.1371/journal.pone.0075000en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253152
dc.description.abstractSize is an important visuo-spatial characteristic of the physical world. In language processing, previous research has demonstrated a processing advantage for words denoting semantically “big” (e.g., jungle) versus “small” (e.g., needle) concrete objects. We investigated whether semantic size plays a role in the recognition of words expressing abstract concepts (e.g., truth). Semantically “big” and “small” concrete and abstract words were presented in a lexical decision task. Responses to “big” words, regardless of their concreteness, were faster than those to “small” words. Critically, we explored the relationship between semantic size and affective characteristics of words as well as their influence on lexical access. Although a word’s semantic size was correlated with its emotional arousal, the temporal locus of arousal effects may depend on the level of concreteness. That is, arousal seemed to have an earlier (lexical) effect on abstract words, but a later (post-lexical) effect on concrete words. Our findings provide novel insights into the semantic representations of size in abstract concepts and highlight that affective attributes of words may not always index lexical access.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was supported by an Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC) grant RES-062-23-1900 to S.C. Sereno and by the Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, University of Glasgow. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherPLOS
dc.rightsAttribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/2.0/uk/*
dc.titleSemantic Size of Abstract Concepts: It Gets Emotional When You Can’t See Iten
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It was first available from PLOS via http://dx.doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0075000en
prism.numbere75000en
prism.publicationDate2013en
prism.volume8en
dc.rioxxterms.funderESRC
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-08-08en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0075000en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-09-25en
dc.contributor.orcidVasiljevic, Milica [0000-0001-7454-7744]
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 2.0 UK: England & Wales