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dc.contributor.authorvan, den Heuvel Odile Aen
dc.contributor.authorvan, Wingen Guidoen
dc.contributor.authorSoriano-Mas, Carlesen
dc.contributor.authorAlonso, Pinoen
dc.contributor.authorChamberlain, Samuelen
dc.contributor.authorNakamae, Takashien
dc.contributor.authorDenys, Damiaanen
dc.contributor.authorGoudriaan, Anna Een
dc.contributor.authorVeltman, Dick Jen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-07T17:01:19Z
dc.date.available2016-01-07T17:01:19Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-11en
dc.identifier.citationEuropean Neuropsychopharmacology 2015. doi:10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.12.005en
dc.identifier.issn0924-977X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253154
dc.description.abstractCompulsivity is associated with alterations in the structure and the function of parallel and interacting brain circuits involved in emotional processing (involving both the reward and the fear circuits), cognitive control, and motor functioning. These brain circuits develop during the pre-natal period and early childhood under strong genetic and environmental influences. In this review we bring together literature on cognitive, emotional, and behavioral processes in compulsivity, based mainly on studies in patients with obsessive–compulsive disorder and addiction. Disease symptoms normally change over time. Goal-directed behaviors, in response to reward or anxiety, often become more habitual over time. During the course of compulsive disorders the mental processes and repetitive behaviors themselves contribute to the neuroplastic changes in the involved circuits, mainly in case of chronicity. On the other hand, successful treatment is able to normalize altered circuit functioning or to induce compensatory mechanisms. We conclude that insight in the neurobiological characteristics of the individual symptom profile and disease course, including the potential targets for neuroplasticity is an unmet need to advance the field.
dc.description.sponsorshipDr. Soriano-Mas is funded by a ׳Miguel Servet׳ contract from the Carlos III Health Institute (CP10/00604). Dr. Goudriaan is supported by a VIDI Innovative Research Grant (Grant no. 91713354) funded by the Dutch Scientific Research Association (NWO-ZonMW). Dr. Alonso was funded by the Instituto de Salut Carlos III-FISPI14/00413. Dr. Nakamae received Grant support from MEXT KAKENHI (Nos. 24791223 and 26461753).
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/*
dc.subjectcortico-striato-thalamico-cortical circuitsen
dc.subjectlimbicen
dc.subjectcompulsivityen
dc.subjectanxietyen
dc.subjectneuroimagingen
dc.titlebrain circuitry of compulsivityen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.12.005en
prism.endingPage827
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameEuropean Neuropsychopharmacologyen
prism.startingPage810
prism.volume26en
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-01en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.euroneuro.2015.12.005en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-11en
dc.contributor.orcidChamberlain, Samuel [0000-0001-7014-8121]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-7862
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-12-11


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