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dc.contributor.authorMytton, Oliveren
dc.contributor.authorPanter, Jennaen
dc.contributor.authorOlilvie, Daviden
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-08T17:17:09Z
dc.date.available2016-01-08T17:17:09Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-29en
dc.identifier.citationPreventive Medicine 2015en
dc.identifier.issn0091-7435
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253185
dc.description.abstractObjective Our aim was to explore longitudinal associations of active commuting (cycling to work and walking to work) with physical wellbeing (PCS-8), mental wellbeing (MCS-8) and sickness absence. Method We used data from the Commuting and Health in Cambridge study (2009 to 2012; n = 801) to test associations between: a) maintenance of cycling (or walking) to work over a one year period and indices of wellbeing at the end of that one year period; and b) associations between change in cycling (or walking) to work and change in indices of wellbeing. Linear regression was used for testing associations with PCS-8 and MCS-8, and negative binomial regression for sickness absence. Results After adjusting for sociodemographic variables, physical activity and physical limitation, those who maintained cycle commuting reported lower sickness absence (0.46, 95% CI: 0.14–0.80; equivalent to one less day per year) and higher MCS-8 scores (1.50, 0.10–2.10) than those who did not cycle to work. The association for sickness absence persisted after adjustment for baseline sickness absence. No significant associations were observed for PCS-8. Associations between change in cycle commuting and change in indices of wellbeing were not significant. No significant associations were observed for walking. Conclusions This work provides some evidence of the value of cycle commuting in improving or maintaining the health and wellbeing of adults of working age. This may be important in engaging employers in the promotion of active travel and communicating the benefits of active travel to employees.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe Commuting and Health in Cambridge study was developed by David Ogilvie, Simon Griffin, Andy Jones and Roger Mackett and initially funded under the auspices of the Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), a UKCRC Public Health Research Centre of Excellence. Funding from the British Heart Foundation, Economic and Social Research Council, Medical Research Council, National Institute for Health Research and the Wellcome Trust, under the auspices of the UK Clinical Research Collaboration, is gratefully acknowledged. The study is now funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Public Health Research programme (project number 09/3001/06: see http://www.nets.nihr.ac.uk/projects/phr/09300106). David Ogilvie is supported by the Medical Research Council [Unit Programme number MC_UP_12015/6]. Jenna Panter is supported by an NIHR post-doctoral fellowship [PDF-2012-05-157] and Oliver Mytton by a Welcome Trust clinical doctoral fellowship. The views and opinions expressed herein are those of the authors and do not necessarily reflect those of the NIHR, the NHSor the Department of Health. The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, the decision to publish, or the preparation of the manuscript. We thank all staff from the MRC Epidemiology Unit Functional Group Team, in particular for study coordination and data collection (led by Cheryl Chapman and Fiona Whittle) and data management (Lena Alexander). We also thank Emma Coombes for linking postcodes to deprivation indices and Louise Foley for her contribution to preparing the questionnaire data for analysis.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectadulten
dc.subjecthealth statusen
dc.subjectpsychologicalen
dc.subjectmotor activityen
dc.subjectwalkingen
dc.subjecttransportationen
dc.subjectabsenteeismen
dc.subjectepidemiologyen
dc.subjectsick leaveen
dc.subjectbicyclingen
dc.titleLongitudinal associations of active commuting with wellbeing and sickness absenceen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.12.010en
prism.endingPage26
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNamePreventive Medicineen
prism.startingPage19
prism.volume84en
dc.rioxxterms.funderBHF
dc.rioxxterms.funderESRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderMRC
dc.rioxxterms.funderNIHR
dc.rioxxterms.funderWellcome Trust
dc.rioxxterms.projectid09/3001/06
dc.rioxxterms.projectidMC_UP_12015/6
dc.rioxxterms.projectidPDF-2012-05-157
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-12-17en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.ypmed.2015.12.010en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-29en
dc.contributor.orcidMytton, Oliver [0000-0003-3218-9912]
dc.contributor.orcidPanter, Jenna [0000-0001-8870-718X]
dc.identifier.eissn1096-0260
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (103394/Z/13/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idNIHR Evaluation, Trials and Studies Coordinating Centre (NETSCC) (PHR/09/3001/06)
pubs.funder-project-idTCC (PDF-2012-05-157)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/6)
pubs.funder-project-idnull (unknown)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/K023187/1)
pubs.funder-project-idESRC (ES/G007462/1)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (087636/Z/08/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idCambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust (CUH) (BRC 2012-2017)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:55:26 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International