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dc.contributor.authorFirbank, Michael Jen
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Rosieen
dc.contributor.authorMak, Elijahen
dc.contributor.authorAribisala, Benjaminen
dc.contributor.authorBarber, Roberten
dc.contributor.authorColloby, Sean Jen
dc.contributor.authorHe, Jiabaoen
dc.contributor.authorBlamire, Andrew Men
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-13T12:54:46Z
dc.date.available2016-01-13T12:54:46Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-06en
dc.identifier.citationFirbank et al. Parkinsonism & Related Disorders (2016), 24, 76-80. doi:10.1016/j.parkreldis.2016.01.003en
dc.identifier.issn1353-8020
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253218
dc.description.abstractObjective: Changes in the white matter of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) have been reported using diffusion weighted MRI, though few longitudinal studies have been done. Methods: We performed diffusion weighted MRI twice, a year apart on 23 AD, 14 DLB, and 32 healthy control subjects. Mean diffusivity (MD) and fractional anisotropy (FA) were calculated. Results: In AD, there were widespread regions where the longitudinal MD increase was greater than in controls, and small areas in the parietal and temporal lobes where it was greater in AD than DLB. In AD, decrease in brain volume correlated with increased MD. There were no significant differences in progression between DLB and controls. Conclusions: In AD the white matter continues to degenerate during the disease process, whereas in DLB, changes in the white matter structure are a relatively early feature. Different mechanisms are likely to underpin changes in diffusivity.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe study was supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Unit in Dementia and the Biomedical Research Centre awarded to Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Cambridge, and the NIHR Biomedical Research Unit in Dementia and the Biomedical Research Centre awarded to Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and Newcastle University. Elijah Mak was in receipt of a Gates Cambridge PhD studentship.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 2.0 UK: England & Wales*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/uk/*
dc.subjectdementia with Lewy bodiesen
dc.subjectAlzheimer's diseaseen
dc.subjectDWIen
dc.subjectMRIen
dc.titleLongitudinal diffusion tensor imaging in dementia with Lewy bodies and Alzheimer’s diseaseen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Elsevier via http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.parkreldis.2016.01.003en
prism.endingPage80
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameParkinsonism & Related Disordersen
prism.startingPage76
prism.volume24en
dc.rioxxterms.funderNIHR
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-01-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.parkreldis.2016.01.003en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-01-06en
dc.contributor.orcidMak, Elijah [0000-0002-6437-8024]
dc.contributor.orcidO'Brien, John [0000-0002-0837-5080]
dc.identifier.eissn1873-5126
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-01-06


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