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dc.contributor.authorStettler, Marc EJen
dc.contributor.authorMidgley, William JBen
dc.contributor.authorSwanson, Jacob Jen
dc.contributor.authorCebon, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorBoies, Adamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T13:49:40Z
dc.date.available2016-01-14T13:49:40Z
dc.date.issued2016-01-12en
dc.identifier.issn0013-936X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253269
dc.description.abstractDual fuel diesel and natural gas heavy goods vehicles (HGVs) operate on a combination of the two fuels simultaneously. By substituting diesel for natural gas, vehicle operators can benefit from reduced fuel costs and as natural gas has a lower CO2 intensity compared to diesel, dual fuel HGVs have the potential to reduce greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from the freight sector. In this study, energy consumption, greenhouse gas and noxious emissions for five after-market dual fuel configurations of two vehicle platforms are compared relative to their diesel-only baseline values over transient and steady state testing. Over a transient cycle, CO2 emissions are reduced by up to 9%; however, methane (CH4) emissions due to incomplete combustion lead to CO2e emissions that are 50–127% higher than the equivalent diesel vehicle. Oxidation catalysts evaluated on the vehicles at steady state reduced CH4 emissions by at most 15% at exhaust gas temperatures representative of transient conditions. This study highlights that control of CH4 emissions and improved control of in-cylinder CH4 combustion are required to reduce total GHG emissions of dual fuel HGVs relative to diesel vehicles.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe authors would like to acknowledge support from the UK Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/K00915X/1), the UK Department for Transport, the Office for Low Emission Vehicles and Innovate UK (project reference: 400266) and the industrial partners of the Centre for Sustainable Road Freight.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherACS
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleGreenhouse Gas and Noxious Emissions from Dual Fuel Diesel and Natural Gas Heavy Goods Vehiclesen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from the American Chemical Society via http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/acs.est.5b04240en
prism.endingPage2026
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Environmental Science and Technologyen
prism.startingPage2018
prism.volume50en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1021/acs.est.5b04240en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-01-12en
dc.contributor.orcidCebon, David [0000-0003-2828-6445]
dc.contributor.orcidBoies, Adam [0000-0003-2915-3273]
dc.identifier.eissn1520-5851
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEPSRC (EP/K00915X/1)
pubs.funder-project-idTechnology Strategy Board (400266)
pubs.funder-project-idFoundation for Research, Science and Technology (New Zealand) (CAMX0801)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-01-12


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International