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dc.contributor.authorHines, Melissaen
dc.contributor.authorPasterski, Vickieen
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Debraen
dc.contributor.authorNeufeld, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorPatalay, Praveethaen
dc.contributor.authorHindmarsh, Peter Cen
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Ieuanen
dc.contributor.authorAcerini, Carloen
dc.date.accessioned2016-01-14T17:00:57Z
dc.date.available2016-01-14T17:00:57Z
dc.date.issued2016-02-01en
dc.identifier.citationHines et al. Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences (2016) Vol. 371, Article 20150125. doi:10.1098/rstb.2015.0125en
dc.identifier.issn0962-8436
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253290
dc.description.abstractIndividual variability in human gender-related behaviour is influenced by many factors, including androgen exposure prenatally, as well as selfsocialization and socialization by others postnatally. Many studies have looked at these types of influences in isolation, but little is known about how they work together. Here, we report that girls exposed to high concentrations of androgens prenatally, because they have the genetic condition, congenital adrenal hyperplasia, show changes in processes related to selfsocialization of gender-related behaviour. Specifically, they are less responsive than other girls to information that particular objects are for girls and they show reduced imitation of female models choosing particular objects. These findings suggest that prenatal androgen exposure may influence subsequent gender-related behaviours, including object (toy) choices, in part by changing processes involved in the self-socialization of gendered behaviour, rather than only by inducing permanent changes in the brain during early development. In addition, the findings suggest that some of the behavioural effects of prenatal androgen exposure might be subject to alteration by postnatal socialization processes. The findings also suggest a previously unknown influence of early androgen exposure on later processes involved in self-socialization of gender-related behaviour, and thus expand understanding of the developmental systems regulating human gender development.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherRoyal Society Publishing
dc.titlePrenatal androgen exposure alters girls' responses to information indicating gender-appropriate behaviouren
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Royal Society Publishing via http://dx.doi.org/10.1098/rstb.2015.0125en
prism.number20150125en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNamePhilosophical Transactions of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciencesen
prism.volume371en
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-28en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1098/rstb.2015.0125en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-02-01en
dc.contributor.orcidSpencer, Debra [0000-0003-0098-5658]
dc.contributor.orcidNeufeld, Sharon [0000-0001-5470-3770]
dc.contributor.orcidAcerini, Carlo [0000-0003-2121-5871]
dc.identifier.eissn1471-2970
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01HD024542)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-02-01


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