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dc.contributor.authorKunstler, Georgesen
dc.contributor.authorFalster, Danielen
dc.contributor.authorCoomes, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorHui, Francisen
dc.contributor.authorKooyman, Robert Men
dc.contributor.authorLaughlin, Daniel Cen
dc.contributor.authorPoorter, Lourensen
dc.contributor.authorVanderwel, Marken
dc.contributor.authorVieilledent, Ghislainen
dc.contributor.authorWright, S Josephen
dc.contributor.authorAiba, Masahiroen
dc.contributor.authorBaraloto, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorCaspersen, Johnen
dc.contributor.authorCornelissen, J Hans Cen
dc.contributor.authorGourlet-Fleury, Sylvieen
dc.contributor.authorHanewinkel, Marcen
dc.contributor.authorHerault, Brunoen
dc.contributor.authorKattge, Jensen
dc.contributor.authorKurokawa, Hirokoen
dc.contributor.authorOnoda, Yusukeen
dc.contributor.authorPeñuelas, Josepen
dc.contributor.authorPoorter, Hendriken
dc.contributor.authorUriarte, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorRichardson, Sarahen
dc.contributor.authorRuiz-Benito, Palomaen
dc.contributor.authorSun, I-Fangen
dc.contributor.authorStåhl, Göranen
dc.contributor.authorSwenson, Nathan Gen
dc.contributor.authorThompson, Jillen
dc.contributor.authorWesterlund, Bertilen
dc.contributor.authorWirth, Christianen
dc.contributor.authorZavala, Miguel Aen
dc.contributor.authorZeng, Hongchengen
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Jess Ken
dc.contributor.authorZimmermann, Niklaus Een
dc.contributor.authorWestoby, Marken
dc.date.accessioned2016-02-01T12:00:17Z
dc.date.available2016-02-01T12:00:17Z
dc.date.issued2015-12-23en
dc.identifier.citationG. Kunstler et al. Nature (2015) Vol. 529, issue 7585, pp. 204-207. DOI:10.1038/nature16476en
dc.identifier.issn0028-0836
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/253570
dc.description.abstractPhenotypic traits and their associated trade-offs have been shown to have globally consistent effects on individual plant physiological functions but how these effects scale up to influence competition, a key driver of community assembly in terrestrial vegetation, has remained unclear. Here we use growth data from more than 3 million trees in over 140,000 plots across the world to show how three key functional traits—wood density, specific leaf area and maximum height—consistently influence competitive interactions. Fast maximum growth of a species was correlated negatively with its wood density in all biomes, and positively with its specific leaf area in most biomes. Low wood density was also correlated with a low ability to tolerate competition and a low competitive effect on neighbours, while high specific leaf area was correlated with a low competitive effect. Thus, traits generate trade-offs between performance with competition versus performance without competition, a fundamental ingredient in the classical hypothesis that the coexistence of plant species is enabled via differentiation in their successional strategies. Competition within species was stronger than between species, but an increase in trait dissimilarity between species had little influence in weakening competition. No benefit of dissimilarity was detected for specific leaf area or wood density, and only a weak benefit for maximum height. Our trait-based approach to modelling competition makes generalization possible across the forest ecosystems of the world and their highly diverse species composition.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe are especially grateful to the researchers whose long-term commitment to establish and maintain forest plots and their associated databases made this study possible, and to those who granted us data access: forest inventories and permanent plots of New Zealand, Spain (MAGRAMA), France, Switzerland, Sweden, US and Canada (for the provinces of Quebec provided by the Ministère des Ressources Naturelles du Québec, Ontario provided by OnTAP’s Growth and Yield Program of the Ontario Ministry of Natural Resources, Saskatchewan, Manitoba, New Brunswick, Newfoundland and Labrador), CTFS (BCI and LTER-Luquillo), Taiwan (Fushan), Cirad (Paracou with funding by CEBA, ANR-10-LABX-25-01), Cirad, MEFCP and ICRA (M’Baïki) and Japan. We thank MPI-BGC Jena, who host TRY, and the international funding networks supporting TRY (IGBP, DIVERSITAS, GLP, NERC, QUEST, FRB and GIS Climate). G.K. was supported by a Marie Curie International Outgoing Fellowship within the 7th European Community Framework Program (Demo-Traits project, no. 299340). The working group that initiated this synthesis was supported by Macquarie University and by Australian Research Council through a fellowship to M.W.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherNature Publishing Group
dc.subjectcommunity ecologyen
dc.subjectplant ecologyen
dc.subjectforest ecologyen
dc.titlePlant functional traits have globally consistent effects on competitionen
dc.typeArticle
dc.provenanceOA-6846
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Nature Publishing Group via http://dx.doi.org/10.1038/nature16476en
prism.endingPage207
prism.publicationDate2015en
prism.publicationNameNatureen
prism.startingPage204
prism.volume529en
dc.rioxxterms.funderNERC
dcterms.dateAccepted2015-11-23en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1038/nature16476en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2015-12-23en
dc.contributor.orcidCoomes, David [0000-0002-8261-2582]
dc.identifier.eissn1476-4687
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2016-07-23


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