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dc.contributor.authorMoore, BCJ
dc.date.accessioned2016-03-23T14:11:27Z
dc.date.available2016-03-23T14:11:27Z
dc.date.issued2016-03
dc.identifier.citationMoore. Journal of the Audio Engineering Society (2016), 64(3), pp. 112-123. doi: 10.17743/jaes.2015.0081
dc.identifier.issn1549-4950
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/254638
dc.descriptionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from the Audio Engineering Society via https://doi.org/10.17743/jaes.2015.0081
dc.description.abstractExposure to high-level music produces several physiological changes in the auditory system that lead to a variety of perceptual effects. Damage to the outer hair cells within the cochlea leads to a loss of sensitivity to weak sounds, loudness recruitment (a more rapid than normal growth of loudness with increasing sound level) and reduced frequency selectivity. Damage to inner hair cells and/or synapses leads to degeneration of neurons in the auditory nerve and to a reduced flow of information to the brain. This leads to poorer auditory discrimination and may contribute to reduced sensitivity to the temporal fine structure of sounds and to poor pitch perception. Hearing aids compensate for the effects of threshold elevation and loudness recruitment via multi-channel amplitude compression, but they do not compensate for reduced frequency selectivity or loss of inner hair cells/synapses/neurons. Multi-channel compression can impair some aspects of the perception of music, such as the ability to hear out one instrument or voice from a mixture. The limited frequency range and irregular frequency response of most hearing aids is associated with poor sound quality for music. Finally, systems for reducing acoustic feedback can have undesirable side effects when listening to music.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was supported by the Medical Research Council (UK, grant number G0701870), Action on Hearing Loss, Phonak, and Starkey.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAudio Engineering Society
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.titleEffects of sound-induced hearing loss and hearing AIDS on the perception of music
dc.typeArticle
dc.type.versionpublished version
prism.endingPage123
prism.issueIdentifier3
prism.publicationDate2016
prism.publicationNameAES: Journal of the Audio Engineering Society
prism.startingPage112
prism.volume64
dc.rioxxterms.funderMRC
dc.rioxxterms.projectidG0701870
pubs.declined2017-10-11T13:54:35.74+0100
datacite.cites.urlhttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/254562
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.17743/jaes.2015.0081
rioxxterms.versionVoR
pubs.funder-project-idEngineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EP/M026957/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G0701870)
cam.issuedOnline2016-03-10
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:54:46 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International