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dc.contributor.authorNoël, P.en
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-22T15:01:30Z
dc.date.available2016-04-22T15:01:30Z
dc.date.issued2013-04-04en
dc.identifier.otherCWPE1312
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/255280
dc.description.abstractFour years after the gas supply crisis of January 2009, this paper looks at the market and policy changes that have changed the European gas situation, and their implications in terms of security of supply. Several positive developments are identified, including the byapssing of Ukraine by Gazprom-sponsored pipelines; the acceleration of import diversification in large markets of western Europe; the process of 'commoditisation' of natural gas in north-west Europe. The lack of meaningful progress in market integration between western and eastern-central Europe, however, leaves in place one of the main factors that made the 2009 crisis possible and conferred it its political significance. Overall, the European gas security situation has evolved in a positive direction mainly because of external forces, not EU policies.en
dc.publisherFaculty of Economics
dc.relation.ispartofseriesCambridge Working Papers in Economics
dc.rightsAll Rights Reserveden
dc.rights.urihttps://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserved/en
dc.subjectPublic Policyen
dc.subjectSecurity of Supply.en
dc.titleEU Gas Supply Security: Unfinished Businessen
dc.typeWorking Paperen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.5692


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