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dc.contributor.authorErmakova, Mariaen
dc.contributor.authorHuokko, Tuomasen
dc.contributor.authorRichaud, Pierreen
dc.contributor.authorBersanini, Lucaen
dc.contributor.authorHowe, Christopheren
dc.contributor.authorLea-Smith, David Jen
dc.contributor.authorPeltier, Gillesen
dc.contributor.authorAllahverdiyeva, Yaguten
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-06T10:26:16Z
dc.date.available2016-05-06T10:26:16Z
dc.date.issued2016-04-18en
dc.identifier.citationErmakova et al. Plant Physiology (2016). doi: 10.​1104/​pp.​16.​00479en
dc.identifier.issn0032-0889
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/255905
dc.description.abstractVarious O2-utilizing electron sinks, including the soluble flavodiiron proteins (Flv1/3), and the membrane-localized respiratory terminal oxidases (RTOs), cytochrome c oxidase (Cox) and quinol oxidase (Cyd), are present in the photosynthetic electron transfer chain of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. However, the role of individual RTOs and their relative importance compared to other electron sinks is poorly understood, particularly under light. Via membrane inlet mass spectrometry gas-exchange, chlorophyll a fluorescence, P700 analysis and inhibitor treatment of wild-type and various mutants deficient in RTOs, Flv1/3 and photosystem I, we investigated the contribution of these complexes to the alleviation of excess electrons in the photosynthetic chain. For the first time we demonstrated the activity of Cyd in O2 uptake under light, although it was detected only upon inhibition of electron transfer at the cytochrome b6f site and in ∆flv1/3 under fluctuating light conditions, where linear electron transfer was drastically inhibited due to impaired PS I activity. Cox is mostly responsible for dark respiration and competes with P700 for electrons under high light. Only the ∆cox/cyd double mutant, but not single mutants, demonstrated a highly reduced PQ pool in darkness and impaired gross O2 evolution under light, indicating that thylakoid-based RTOs are able to compensate partially for each other. Thus both electron sinks contribute to alleviation of excess electrons under illumination: RTOs continue to function under light, operating on slower time ranges and on a limited scale, whereas Flv1/3 responds rapidly as a light-induced component and has greater capacity.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was financially supported by the Academy of Finland Finnish Centre of Excellence in Molecular Biology of Primary Producers (2014-2 019) project #271832 and by the Kone Foundation (to Y.A.). L.B. was supported by the Alfred Kordelin Foundation, D.J.L-S by the Environmental Services Association Education Trust. Support was also provided by the HélioBiotec platform, funded by the European Union (European Regional Development Fund), the Région Provence Alpes Côte d’Azur, the French Ministry of Research, and the CEA.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Society of Plant Biologists
dc.titleDistinguishing the roles of thylakoid respiratory terminal oxidases in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803en
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from the American Society of Plant Biologists via http://dx.doi.org/10.​1104/​pp.​16.​00479en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNamePlant Physiologyen
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-04-11en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1104/pp.16.00479en
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-04-18en
dc.contributor.orcidHowe, Christopher [0000-0002-6975-8640]
dc.identifier.eissn1532-2548
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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