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dc.contributor.authorRemes, Oliviaen
dc.contributor.authorBrayne, Carolen
dc.contributor.authorvan, der Linde Rianneen
dc.contributor.authorLafortune, Louiseen
dc.date.accessioned2016-05-10T13:09:53Z
dc.date.available2016-05-10T13:09:53Z
dc.date.issued2016-06-05en
dc.identifier.citationRemes et al. Brain and Behavior (2016) DOI: 10.1002/brb3.497en
dc.identifier.issn2162-3279
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/255955
dc.description.abstractBackground: A fragmented research field exists on the prevalence of anxiety disorders. Here we present the results of a systematic review of reviews on this topic. We included the highest quality studies to inform practice and policy on this issue. Method: Using PRISMA methodology, extensive electronic and manual citation searches were performed to identify relevant reviews. Screening, data extraction, and quality assessment were undertaken by two reviewers. Inclusion criteria consisted of systematic reviews or meta-analyses on the prevalence of anxiety disorders that fulfilled at least half of the AMSTAR quality criteria. Results: We identified a total of 48 reviews and described the prevalence of anxiety across population sub-groups and settings, as reported by these studies. Despite the high heterogeneity of prevalence estimates across primary studies, there was emerging and compelling evidence of substantial prevalence of anxiety disorders generally (3.8–25%), and particularly in women (5.2–8.7%); young adults (2.5–9.1%); people with chronic diseases (1.4–70%); and individuals from Euro/Anglo cultures (3.8–10.4%) versus individuals from Indo/Asian (2.8%), African (4.4%), Central/Eastern European (3.2%), North African/Middle Eastern (4.9%), and Ibero/Latin cultures (6.2%). Conclusions: The prevalence of anxiety disorders is high in population sub-groups across the globe. Recent research has expanded its focus to Asian countries, an increasingly greater number of physical and psychiatric conditions, and traumatic events associated with anxiety. Further research on illness trajectories and anxiety levels pre- and post-treatment is needed. Few studies have been conducted in developing and under-developed parts of the world and have little representation in the global literature.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectanxietyen
dc.subjectanxiety disordersen
dc.subjectepidemiologyen
dc.subjectprevalenceen
dc.subjectmental disordersen
dc.subjectinternationalen
dc.subjectdemographicsen
dc.titleA systematic review of reviews on the prevalence of anxiety disorders in adult populationsen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from Wiley via http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/brb3.497.en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameBrain and Behavioren
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-04-08en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/brb3.497en
rioxxterms.versionVoR
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-06-05en
dc.contributor.orcidBrayne, Carol [0000-0001-5307-663X]
dc.contributor.orcidLafortune, Louise [0000-0002-9018-1217]
dc.identifier.eissn2162-3279
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (unknown)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International