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dc.contributor.authorPark, Gen
dc.contributor.authorYaden, DBen
dc.contributor.authorSchwartz, HAen
dc.contributor.authorKern, MLen
dc.contributor.authorEichstaedt, JCen
dc.contributor.authorKosinski, Men
dc.contributor.authorStillwell, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorUngar, LHen
dc.contributor.authorSeligman, MEPen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-06T11:08:17Z
dc.date.available2016-06-06T11:08:17Z
dc.date.issued2016-05en
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/256176
dc.description.abstractUsing a large social media dataset and open-vocabulary methods from computational linguistics, we explored differences in language use across gender, affiliation, and assertiveness. In Study 1, we analyzed topics (groups of semantically similar words) across 10 million messages from over 52,000 Facebook users. Most language differed little across gender. However, topics most associated with self-identified female participants included friends, family, and social life, whereas topics most associated with self-identified male participants included swearing, anger, discussion of objects instead of people, and the use of argumentative language. In Study 2, we plotted male- and female-linked language topics along two interpersonal dimensions prevalent in gender research: affiliation and assertiveness. In a sample of over 15,000 Facebook users, we found substantial gender differences in the use of affiliative language and slight differences in assertive language. Language used more by self-identified females was interpersonally warmer, more compassionate, polite, and—contrary to previous findings—slightly more assertive in their language use, whereas language used more by self-identified males was colder, more hostile, and impersonal. Computational linguistic analysis combined with methods to automatically label topics offer means for testing psychological theories unobtrusively at large scale.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International*
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/*
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleWomen are warmer but no less assertive than men: gender and language on Facebooken
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPagee0155885
prism.issueIdentifier5en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNamePLoS Oneen
prism.startingPagee0155885
prism.volume11en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.117
datacite.cites.urlhttps://osf.io/cv73k/?view_only=1c1bd198f906475b857277b8645b955een
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-05-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1371/journal.pone.0155885en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-05en
dc.contributor.orcidStillwell, David [0000-0003-0174-3212]
dc.identifier.eissn1932-6203
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2016-05-25en


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International