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dc.contributor.authorKung, Karson TFen
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, Debraen
dc.contributor.authorPasterski, Vickieen
dc.contributor.authorNeufeld, Sharonen
dc.contributor.authorGlover, Vivetteen
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Thomas Gen
dc.contributor.authorHindmarsh, Peter Cen
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Ieuanen
dc.contributor.authorAcerini, Carloen
dc.contributor.authorHines, Melissaen
dc.date.accessioned2016-06-21T10:02:13Z
dc.date.available2016-06-21T10:02:13Z
dc.date.issued2016-07-27en
dc.identifier.issn0021-9630
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/256401
dc.description.abstractBackground: There is a marked male preponderance in autism spectrum conditions. The extreme male brain theory and the fetal androgen theory of autism suggest that elevated prenatal testosterone exposure is a key contributor to autistic traits. The current paper reports findings from two separate studies that test this hypothesis. Methods: A parent-report questionnaire, the Childhood Autism Spectrum Test (CAST), was employed to measure autistic traits in both studies. The first study examined autistic traits in young children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia (CAH), a condition causing unusually high concentrations of testosterone prenatally in girls. 81 children with CAH (43 girls) and 72 unaffected relatives (41 girls), aged 4 to 11 years, were assessed. The second study examined autistic traits in relation to amniotic testosterone in 92 typically-developing children (48 girls), aged 3 to 5 years. Results: Findings from neither study supported the association between prenatal androgen (testosterone) exposure and autistic traits. Specifically, young girls with and without CAH did not differ significantly in CAST scores and amniotic testosterone concentrations were not significantly associated with CAST scores in boys, girls, or the whole sample. Conclusions: These studies do not support a relationship between prenatal testosterone exposure and autistic traits. These findings augment prior research suggesting no consistent relationship between early androgen exposure and autistic traits.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Institutes of Health (Grant ID: R01HD024542)
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectcongenital adrenal hyperplasiaen
dc.subjectfetal testosteroneen
dc.subjectprenatal testosterone exposureen
dc.subjectautismen
dc.subjectautistic traitsen
dc.subjectextreme male brainen
dc.titleNo relationship between prenatal androgen exposure and autistic traits: convergent evidence from studies of children with congenital adrenal hyperplasia and of amniotic testosterone concentrations in typically developing childrenen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Wiley via http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/jcpp.12602en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameJournal of Child Psychology and Psychiatryen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.344
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-05-23en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/jcpp.12602en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-07-27en
dc.contributor.orcidSpencer, Debra [0000-0003-0098-5658]
dc.contributor.orcidNeufeld, Sharon [0000-0001-5470-3770]
dc.contributor.orcidAcerini, Carlo [0000-0003-2121-5871]
dc.identifier.eissn1469-7610
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idEunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (R01HD024542)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-07-27


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