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dc.contributor.authorWilliams, Gavin
dc.date.accessioned2016-09-20T09:20:37Z
dc.date.available2016-09-20T09:20:37Z
dc.date.issued2016-09-28
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/260239
dc.descriptionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Cambridge University Press via https://doi.org/10.1017/S095458671600032Xen
dc.description.abstractPapa—maman—ma femme—mon mari—a propos—Marianna—Roma—madame—la reine—le roi—a Paris—allons. These were among the first babbled words of Wolfgang von Kempelen’s speaking machine when it was exhibited in 1783. Kempelen’s design, which consisted of bellows that pumped air through trachea-like attachments, forsook its native German to speak largely in French. A contemporary observer remarked that, though the machine was clearly at an early stage of development, it gave a fairly accurate imitation of a five-year-old child, with only one minor speech impediment: ‘its voice is pleasant and sweet, only the R is pronounced gutturally and with a little rumbling’ (‘la voix en est agréable & douce, il n’y a que l’R qu’elle prononce en grasseyant & avec un certain ronflement’). Elsewhere, the machine seems to have made the most of a limited vocabulary by making friends, declaring love and hailing rulers of empires past and present.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherCambridge University Pressen
dc.titleMachine Speak Ruggiero Leoncavallo, ‘Vesti la giubba’ (Pagliacci), I Pagliacci, Act Ien
dc.typeArticleen
prism.endingPage246
prism.issueIdentifier2
prism.publicationNameCambridge Opera Journalen
prism.startingPage243
prism.volume28
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.4471
pubs.declined2017-10-11T13:54:43.175+0100
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-07-27
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1017/S095458671600032X
rioxxterms.versionAMen


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