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dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Rebekah Men
dc.contributor.authorLandin-Romero, Ramonen
dc.contributor.authorCollet, Tinh-Haien
dc.contributor.authorvan der Klaauw, Agathaen
dc.contributor.authorDevenney, Emmaen
dc.contributor.authorHenning, Elanaen
dc.contributor.authorKiernan, Matthew Cen
dc.contributor.authorPiguet, Olivieren
dc.contributor.authorFarooqi, Ismaaen
dc.contributor.authorHodges, John Ren
dc.date.accessioned2016-10-26T13:09:00Z
dc.date.available2016-10-26T13:09:00Z
dc.date.issued2016-10-27en
dc.identifier.issn0006-8950
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/260918
dc.description.abstractSee Finger (doi:10.1093/aww312) for a scientific commentary on this article. Abnormal eating behaviour and metabolic parameters including insulin resistance, dyslipidaemia and body mass index are increasingly recognized as important components of neurodegenerative disease and may contribute to survival. It has previously been established that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia is associated with abnormal eating behaviour characterized by increased sweet preference. In this study, it was hypothesized that behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia might also be associated with altered energy expenditure. A cohort of 19 patients with behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, 13 with Alzheimer’s disease and 16 (age- and sex-matched) healthy control subjects were studied using Actiheart devices (CamNtech) to assess resting and stressed heart rate. Actiheart devices were fitted for 7 days to measure sleeping heart rate, activity levels, and resting, active and total energy expenditure. Using high resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging the neural correlates of increased resting heart rate were investigated including cortical thickness and region of interest analyses. In behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, resting (P = 0.001), stressed (P = 0.037) and sleeping heart rate (P = 0.038) were increased compared to control subjects, and resting heart rate (P = 0.020) compared to Alzheimer disease patients. Behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia was associated with decreased activity levels compared to controls (P = 0.002) and increased resting energy expenditure (P = 0.045) and total energy expenditure (P = 0.035). Increased resting heart rate correlated with behavioural (Cambridge Behavioural Inventory) and cognitive measures (Addenbrooke’s Cognitive Examination). Increased resting heart rate in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia correlated with atrophy involving the mesial temporal cortex, insula, and amygdala, regions previously suggested to be involved exclusively in social and emotion processing in frontotemporal dementia. These neural correlates overlap the network involved in eating behaviour in frontotemporal dementia, suggesting a complex interaction between eating behaviour, autonomic function and energy homeostasis. As such the present study suggests that increased heart rate and autonomic changes are prevalent in behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia, and are associated with changes in energy expenditure. An understanding of these changes and neural correlates may have potential relevance to disease progression and prognosis.
dc.description.sponsorshipNational Health and Medical Research Council of Australia (Grant IDs: 1037746, 1003139, 1022684), Australian Research Council Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders Memory Node (Grant ID: CE110001021), Royal Australasian College of Physicians (PhD scholar), MND Australia (PhD scholar), Wellcome Trust, Medical Research Council, European Research Council, National Institute for Health Research Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre, The Bernard Wolfe Endowment, Swiss National Science Foundation (Grant IDs: PBLAP3-145870, P3SMP3-155318)
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherOxford University Press
dc.subjectfrontotemporal dementiaen
dc.subjectmetabolismen
dc.subjectheart rateen
dc.subjectphysiologyen
dc.subjectautonomic functionen
dc.titleEnergy expenditure in frontotemporal dementia: a behavioural and imaging studyen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the author accepted manuscript. The final version is available from Oxford University Press via https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/aww263en
prism.endingPage183
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameBrainen
prism.startingPage171
prism.volume140en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.6092
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-04en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1093/brain/aww263en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-10-27en
dc.contributor.orcidHenning, Elana [0000-0002-0399-4114]
dc.contributor.orcidFarooqi, Ismaa [0000-0001-7609-3504]
dc.identifier.eissn1460-2156
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (099038/Z/12/Z)
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-10-27


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