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dc.contributor.authorCallan, Mitchell Jen
dc.contributor.authorKim, Hyunjien
dc.contributor.authorGheorghiu, Ana Ien
dc.contributor.authorSkylark, Williamen
dc.date.accessioned2016-11-17T11:35:02Z
dc.date.available2016-11-17T11:35:02Z
dc.date.issued2016-11-11en
dc.identifier.issn1948-5506
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/261182
dc.description.abstractWe propose that personal relative deprivation (PRD)—the belief that one is worse off than similar others—plays a key role in the link between social class and prosociality. Across multiple samples and measures (total $\textit{N}$ = 2,233), people higher in PRD were less inclined to help others. When considered in isolation, neither objective nor subjective socioeconomic status (SES) was meaningfully associated with prosociality. However, because people who believe themselves to be at the top of the socioeconomic hierarchy are typically low in PRD, these variables act as mutual suppressors—the predictive validity of both is enhanced when they are considered simultaneously, revealing that both higher subjective SES and higher PRD are associated with lower prosociality. These results cast new light on the complex connections between relative social status and people’s willingness to act for the benefit of others.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was supported by Grant RPG-2013-148 from the Leverhulme Trust and studentship ES/J500045/1 from the Economic and Social Research Council.
dc.languageEnglishen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSAGE Publications
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectsocioeconomic statusen
dc.subjectpersonal relative deprivationen
dc.subjectsocial classen
dc.subjectprosocial beliefsen
dc.subjectprosocial behavioren
dc.titleThe Interrelations Between Social Class, Personal Relative Deprivation, and Prosocialityen
dc.typeArticle
dc.description.versionThis is the final version of the article. It first appeared from SAGE Publications via https://doi.org/10.1177/1948550616673877en
prism.publicationDate2016en
prism.publicationNameSocial Psychological and Personality Scienceen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.6351
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-09-15en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1177/1948550616673877en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2016-11-11en
dc.contributor.orcidSkylark, William [0000-0002-3375-2669]
dc.identifier.eissn1948-5514
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:56:59 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International