Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDiederen, Kelly
dc.contributor.authorZiauddeen, Hisham
dc.contributor.authorVestergaard, Martin
dc.contributor.authorSpencer, T
dc.contributor.authorSchultz, Wolfram
dc.contributor.authorFletcher, Paul
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-08T14:38:20Z
dc.date.available2017-02-08T14:38:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-15
dc.identifier.issn0270-6474
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/262378
dc.description.abstractLearning to optimally predict rewards requires agents to account for fluctuations in reward value. Recent work suggests that individuals can efficiently learn about variable rewards through adaptation of the learning rate, and coding of prediction errors relative to reward variability. Such adaptive coding has been linked to midbrain dopamine neurons in non-human primates, and evidence in support for a similar role of the dopaminergic system in humans is emerging from fMRI data. Here, we sought to investigate the effect of dopaminergic perturbations on adaptive prediction error coding in humans, using a between-subject, placebo-controlled pharmacological fMRI study with a dopaminergic agonist (bromocriptine) and antagonist (sulpiride). Participants performed a previously validated task in which they predicted the magnitude of upcoming rewards drawn from distributions with varying standard deviations. After each prediction, participants received a reward, yielding trial- by-trial prediction errors. Under placebo, we replicated previous observations of adaptive coding in the midbrain and ventral striatum. Treatment with sulpiride attenuated adaptive coding in both midbrain and ventral striatum, and was associated with a decrease in performance, whereas bromocriptine did not have a significant impact. Although we observed no differential effect of SD on performance between the groups, computational modelling suggested decreased behavioral adaptation in the sulpiride group. These results suggest that normal dopaminergic function is critical for adaptive prediction error coding, a key property of the brain thought to facilitate efficient learning in variable environments. Crucially, these results also offer potential insights for understanding the impact of disrupted dopamine function in mental illness.
dc.description.sponsorshipWellcome Trust, Bernard Wolfe Health Neuroscience Fund, Niels Stensen Foundation
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherSociety for Neuroscience
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.subjectdopamine
dc.subjectadaptation
dc.subjectprediction errors
dc.subjectfMRI
dc.subjectreward
dc.subjectpharmacological intervention
dc.titleDopamine modulates adaptive prediction error coding in the human midbrain and striatum
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1720
prism.issueIdentifier7
prism.publicationDate2017
prism.publicationNameThe Journal of Neuroscience
prism.startingPage1708
prism.volume37
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.7642
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-11-13
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1523/JNEUROSCI.1979-16.2016
rioxxterms.versionAM
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-02-15
dc.contributor.orcidZiauddeen, Hisham [0000-0003-4044-1719]
dc.contributor.orcidSchultz, Wolfram [0000-0002-8530-4518]
dc.contributor.orcidFletcher, Paul [0000-0001-8257-1517]
dc.identifier.eissn1529-2401
dc.publisher.urlhttp://www.jneurosci.org/content/37/7/1708
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Review
cam.issuedOnline2017-02-15
dc.identifier.urlhttp://www.jneurosci.org/content/37/7/1708
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:57:08 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record

Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International