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dc.contributor.authorGarrison, Janeen
dc.contributor.authorMoseley, Peteren
dc.contributor.authorAlderson-Day, Benen
dc.contributor.authorSmailes, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorFernyhough, Charlesen
dc.contributor.authorSimons, Jonen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-08T17:06:26Z
dc.date.available2017-02-08T17:06:26Z
dc.date.issued2017-06en
dc.identifier.issn0010-9452
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/262385
dc.description.abstractPeople with schizophrenia who hallucinate show impairments in reality monitoring (the ability to distinguish internally generated information from information obtained from external sources) compared to non-hallucinating patients and healthy individuals. While this may be explained at least in part by an increased externalizing bias, it remains unclear whether this impairment is specific to reality monitoring, or whether it also reflects a general deficit in the monitoring of self-generated information (internal source monitoring). Much interest has focused recently on continuum models of psychosis which argue that hallucination-proneness is distributed in clinical and non-clinical groups, but few studies have directly investigated reality monitoring and internal source monitoring abilities in healthy individuals with a proneness to hallucinations. Two experiments are presented here: the first ($\textit{N}$ = 47, with participants selected for hallucination-proneness from a larger sample of 677 adults) found no evidence of an impairment or externalizing bias on a reality monitoring task in hallucination-prone individuals; the second ($\textit{N}$ = 124) found no evidence of atypical performance on an internal source monitoring task in hallucination-prone individuals. The significance of these findings is reviewed in light of the clinical evidence and the implications for models of hallucination generation discussed.
dc.description.sponsorshipJRG was supported by a University of Cambridge Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute studentship, funded by a joint award from the UK Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust. PM, BA-D, DS, and CF were supported by a Wellcome Trust Collaborative award. JSS was supported by a James S. McDonnell Foundation Scholar award.
dc.format.mediumPrint-Electronicen
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.titleTesting continuum models of psychosis: No reduction in source monitoring ability in healthy individuals prone to auditory hallucinations.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage207
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameCortex; a journal devoted to the study of the nervous system and behavioren
prism.startingPage197
prism.volume91en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.7649
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-11-14en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.cortex.2016.11.011en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-06en
dc.contributor.orcidSimons, Jon [0000-0002-7508-9084]
dc.identifier.eissn1973-8102
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (G0001354)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1000183)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:53:48 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International