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dc.contributor.authorHodgetts, Sen
dc.contributor.authorGallagher, Pen
dc.contributor.authorStow, Den
dc.contributor.authorFerrier, INen
dc.contributor.authorO'Brien, Johnen
dc.date.accessioned2017-02-09T16:32:46Z
dc.date.available2017-02-09T16:32:46Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn0885-6230
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/262427
dc.description.abstract$\textbf{OBJECTIVE}$: Depression is known to negatively impact social functioning, with patients commonly reporting difficulties maintaining social relationships. Moreover, a large body of evidence suggests poor social functioning is not only present in depression but that social functioning is an important factor in illness course and outcome. In addition, good social relationships can play a protective role against the onset of depressive symptoms, particularly in late-life depression. However, the majority of research in this area has employed self-report measures of social function. This approach is problematic, as due to their reliance on memory, such measures are prone to error from the neurocognitive impairments of depression, as well as mood-congruent biases. $\textbf{METHOD}$: Narrative review based on searches of the Web of Science and PubMed database(s) from the start of the databases, until the end of 2015. $\textbf{RESULTS}$: The present review provides an overview of the literature on social functioning in (late-life) depression and discusses the potential for new technologies to improve the measurement of social function in depressed older adults. In particular, the use of wearable technology to collect direct, objective measures of social activity, such as physical activity and speech, is considered. $\textbf{CONCLUSION}$: In order to develop a greater understanding of social functioning in late-life depression, future research should include the development and validation of more direct, objective measures in conjunction with subjective self-report measures.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis study was funded by an award from the UK Medical Research Council (G1001828/1). JTO'B is supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre and Biomedical Research Unit in Dementia awarded to Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Trust and the University of Cambridge and the study was supported by the NIHR Biomedical Research Centre awarded to Newcastle upon Tyne Hospitals NHS Trust and Newcastle University. P. G., I. N. F. and D. S. received Research Capability Funding from the Northumberland, Tyne and Wear NHS Foundation Trust, which also supported this project. Part of this work has been funded by the RCUK Digital Economy Research Hub on Social Inclusion through the Digital Economy (SiDE) [EP/G066019/1].
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectlate-life depressionen
dc.subjectself-reporten
dc.subjectsocial functionen
dc.subjectwearable technologyen
dc.titleThe impact and measurement of social dysfunction in late-life depression: an evaluation of current methods with a focus on wearable technologyen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage255
prism.issueIdentifier3en
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameInternational Journal of Geriatric Psychiatryen
prism.startingPage247
prism.volume32en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.7691
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-10-26en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1002/gps.4632en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-01en
dc.contributor.orcidO'Brien, John [0000-0002-0837-5080]
dc.identifier.eissn1099-1166
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2016-12-02en
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-12-02


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