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dc.contributor.authorCarrad, DJen
dc.contributor.authorMostert, ABen
dc.contributor.authorUllah, ARen
dc.contributor.authorBurke, AMen
dc.contributor.authorJoyce, Hannahen
dc.contributor.authorTan, HHen
dc.contributor.authorJagadish, Cen
dc.contributor.authorKrogstrup, Pen
dc.contributor.authorNygård, Jen
dc.contributor.authorMeredith, Pen
dc.contributor.authorMicolich, APen
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-27T10:39:59Z
dc.date.available2017-03-27T10:39:59Z
dc.date.issued2017-02-08en
dc.identifier.issn1530-6984
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/263251
dc.description.abstractA key task in the emerging field of bioelectronics is the transduction between ionic/protonic and electronic signals at high fidelity. This is a considerable challenge since the two carrier types exhibit intrinsically different physics and are best supported by very different materials typeselectronic signals in inorganic semiconductors and ionic/protonic signals in organic or bio-organic polymers, gels, or electrolytes. Here we demonstrate a new class of organic−inorganic transducing interface featuring semiconducting nanowires electrostatically gated using a solid proton-transporting hygroscopic polymer. This model platform allows us to study the basic transducing mechanisms as well as deliver high fidelity signal conversion by tapping into and drawing together the best candidates from traditionally disparate realms of electronic materials research. By combining complementary $n$- and $p$-type transducers we demonstrate functional logic with significant potential for scaling toward high-density integrated bioelectronic circuitry.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by the Australian Research Council (ARC), the University of New South Wales, the University of Queensland, Danish National Research Foundation and the Innovation Fund. A.P.M. acknowledges an ARC Future Fellowship (FT0990285) and DJC acknowledges Australian Nanotechnology Network Short Term Visit support. P.M. is an ARC Discovery Outstanding Research Award Fellow and the work at UQ was funded under the ARC Discovery Program (DP140103653). The Centre for Organic Photonics and Electronics is a strategic initiative of the University of Queensland. We thank Helen Rutlidge for conducting the inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry measurements. This work was performed in part using the NSW and ACT nodes of the Australian National Fabrication Facility (ANFF) and the Mark Wainwright Analytical Centre at UNSW.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherAmerican Chemical Society
dc.subjectIII−V nanowiresen
dc.subjectbioelectronicsen
dc.subjecthybrid organic/inorganic electronicsen
dc.subjectproton-to-electron transductionen
dc.titleHybrid Nanowire Ion-to-Electron Transducers for Integrated Bioelectronic Circuitryen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage833
prism.issueIdentifier2en
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameNano Lettersen
prism.startingPage827
prism.volume17en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.8571
dcterms.dateAccepted2016-12-21en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1021/acs.nanolett.6b04075en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-02-08en
dc.contributor.orcidJoyce, Hannah [0000-0002-9737-680X]
dc.identifier.eissn1530-6992
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2016-12-21en
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2017-12-21


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