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dc.contributor.authorAcharjee, Aen
dc.contributor.authorPrentice, Pen
dc.contributor.authorAcerini, Carloen
dc.contributor.authorSmith, Jen
dc.contributor.authorHughes, Ieuanen
dc.contributor.authorOng, Kennethen
dc.contributor.authorGriffin, Julianen
dc.contributor.authorDunger, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorKoulman, Alberten
dc.date.accessioned2017-03-29T08:14:33Z
dc.date.available2017-03-29T08:14:33Z
dc.date.issued2017-03-01en
dc.identifier.issn1573-3882
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/263305
dc.description.abstract$\textbf{INTRODUCTION}$: Links between early life exposures and later health outcomes may, in part, be due to $\textit{nutritional programming}$ in infancy. This hypothesis is supported by observed long-term benefits associated with breastfeeding, such as better cognitive development in childhood, and lower risks of obesity and high blood pressure in later life. However, the possible underlying mechanisms are expected to be complex and may be difficult to disentangle due to the lack of understanding of the metabolic processes that differentiate breastfed infants compared to those receiving just formula feed. $\textbf{OBJECTIVE}$: Our aim was to investigate the relationships between infant feeding and the lipid profiles and to validate specific lipids in separate datasets so that a small set of lipids can be used as nutritional biomarkers. $\textbf{METHOD}$: We utilized a direct infusion high-resolution mass spectrometry method to analyse the lipid profiles of 3.2 mm dried blood spot samples collected at age 3 months from the Cambridge Baby Growth Study (CBGS-1), which formed the discovery cohort. For validation two sample sets were profiled: Cambridge Baby Growth Study (CBGS-2) and Pregnancy Outcome Prediction Study (POPS). Lipidomic profiles were compared between infant groups who were either exclusively breastfed, exclusively formula-fed or mixed-fed at various levels. Data analysis included supervised Random Forest method with combined classification and regression mode. Selection of lipids was based on an iterative backward elimination procedure without compromising the class error in the classification mode. $\textbf{CONCLUSION}$: From this study, we were able to identify and validate three lipids: PC(35:2), SM(36:2) and SM(39:1) that can be used collectively as biomarkers for infant nutrition during early development. These biomarkers can be used to determine whether young infants (3-6 months) are breast-fed or receive formula milk.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis research was funded by MRC programme award Lipid Profiling and Signalling (number UD99999906) and Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council project The validation of biomarkers of metabolic efficacy in infant nutrition (ref BB/M027252/1).
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectlipidomicsen
dc.subjectbiomarker discoveryen
dc.subjectrandom Foresten
dc.subjectinfant nutritionen
dc.titleThe translation of lipid profiles to nutritional biomarkers in the study of infant metabolismen
dc.typeArticle
prism.number25en
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameMetabolomicsen
prism.volume13en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.8640
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-01-12en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s11306-017-1166-2en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-03-01en
dc.contributor.orcidAcerini, Carlo [0000-0003-2121-5871]
dc.contributor.orcidOng, Kenneth [0000-0003-4689-7530]
dc.contributor.orcidGriffin, Julian [0000-0003-1336-7744]
dc.contributor.orcidDunger, David [0000-0002-2566-9304]
dc.contributor.orcidKoulman, Albert [0000-0001-9998-051X]
dc.identifier.eissn1573-3890
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/P011705/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1001995)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/P01836X/1)
pubs.funder-project-idBBSRC (BB/M027252/2)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/2)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G0600717B)
pubs.funder-project-idBBSRC (via European Molecular Biology Laboratory (EMBL)) (BB/L024152/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (MC_PC_13030)
pubs.funder-project-idBiotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BB/M027252/1)
cam.issuedOnline2017-01-28en
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:56:44 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International