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dc.contributor.authorElleri, Danielaen
dc.contributor.authorDunger, Daviden
dc.contributor.authorHovorka, Romanen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-04T13:49:37Z
dc.date.available2017-04-04T13:49:37Z
dc.date.issued2011-11-09en
dc.identifier.issn1741-7015
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/263463
dc.description.abstractType 1 diabetes is one of the most common endocrine problems in childhood and adolescence, and remains a serious chronic disorder with increased morbidity and mortality, and reduced quality of life. Technological innovations positively affect the management of type 1 diabetes. Closed-loop insulin delivery (artificial pancreas) is a recent medical innovation, aiming to reduce the risk of hypoglycemia while achieving tight control of glucose. Characterized by real-time glucose-responsive insulin administration, closed-loop systems combine glucose-sensing and insulin-delivery components. In the most viable and researched configuration, a disposable sensor measures interstitial glucose levels, which are fed into a control algorithm controlling delivery of a rapid-acting insulin analog into the subcutaneous tissue by an insulin pump. Research progress builds on an increasing use of insulin pumps and availability of glucose monitors. We review the current status of insulin delivery, focusing on clinical evaluations of closed-loop systems. Future goals are outlined, and benefits and limitations of closed-loop therapy contrasted. The clinical utility of these systems is constrained by inaccuracies in glucose sensing, inter- and intra-patient variability, and delays due to absorption of insulin from the subcutaneous tissue, all of which are being gradually addressed.
dc.description.sponsorshipSupported by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (#22-2006-1113, #22-2007-1801, #22-2009-801), Diabetes UK (BDA07/0003549, BDA07/0003551), European Commission Framework Programme 7 (247138), NIDDK (DK085621), and NIHR Cambridge Biomedical Research Centre.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBioMed Central
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectAdolescenten
dc.subjectAdulten
dc.subjectChilden
dc.subjectDiabetes Mellitus, Type 1en
dc.subjectHumansen
dc.subjectInsulin Infusion Systemsen
dc.subjectPancreas, Artificialen
dc.titleClosed-loop insulin delivery for treatment of type 1 diabetesen
dc.typeArticle
prism.number120en
prism.publicationDate2011en
prism.publicationNameBMC Medicineen
prism.volume9en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.8808
dcterms.dateAccepted2011-11-09en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1186/1741-7015-9-120en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2011-11-09en
dc.contributor.orcidDunger, David [0000-0002-2566-9304]
dc.contributor.orcidHovorka, Roman [0000-0003-2901-461X]
dc.identifier.eissn1741-7015
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idDiabetes UK (07/0003549)
pubs.funder-project-idNational Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) (R01DK085621)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G0600717B)
pubs.funder-project-idEC FP7 CP (247138)
pubs.funder-project-idJuvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Ltd (JDRF) (22-2007-1801)
pubs.funder-project-idJuvenile Diabetes Research Foundation Ltd (JDRF) (22-2006-1113)


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International