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dc.contributor.authorFernando, ABPen
dc.contributor.authorMurray, Jenniferen
dc.contributor.authorMilton, Amyen
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T08:28:53Z
dc.date.available2017-04-12T08:28:53Z
dc.date.issued2013-12-06en
dc.identifier.issn1662-5153
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/263618
dc.description.abstractThe amygdala has traditionally been associated with fear, mediating the impact of negative emotions on memory. However, this view does not fully encapsulate the function of the amygdala, nor the impact that processing in this structure has on the motivational limbic corticostriatal circuitry of which it is an important structure. Here we discuss the interactions between different amygdala nuclei with cortical and striatal regions involved in motivation; interconnections and parallel circuitries that have become increasingly understood in recent years. We review the evidence that the amygdala stores memories that allow initially motivationally neutral stimuli to become associated through pavlovian conditioning with motivationally relevant outcomes which, importantly, can be either appetitive (e.g. food) or aversive (e.g. electric shock). We also consider how different psychological processes supported by the amygdala such as conditioned reinforcement and punishment, conditioned motivation and suppression, and conditioned approach and avoidance behavior, are not only psychologically but also neurobiologically dissociable, being mediated by distinct yet overlapping neural circuits within the limbic corticostriatal circuitry. Clearly the role of the amygdala goes beyond encoding aversive stimuli to also encode the appetitive, requiring an appreciation of the amygdala's mediation of both appetitive and fearful behavior through diverse psychological processes.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was conducted in the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute, a joint initiative funded by the UK Medical Research Council (MRC) and the Wellcome Trust, in the Department of Psychology at the University of Cambridge. Anushka B. P. Fernando was supported by an MRC CASE studentship, Jennifer E. Murray was supported by an MRC Programme Grant (no. G1002231), and Amy L. Milton is the Ferreras-Willetts Fellow in Neuroscience at Downing College, Cambridge.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherFrontiers Media
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectamygdalaen
dc.subjectappetitive and aversive conditioningen
dc.subjectcorticostriatal pathwayen
dc.subjectmemoryen
dc.subjectpavlovianen
dc.titleThe amygdala: securing pleasure and avoiding painen
dc.typeArticle
prism.number190en
prism.publicationDate2013en
prism.publicationNameFrontiers in Behavioral Neuroscienceen
prism.volume7en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.8970
dcterms.dateAccepted2013-11-18en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.3389/fnbeh.2013.00190en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2013-12-06en
dc.contributor.orcidMilton, Amy [0000-0003-0175-9417]
dc.identifier.eissn1662-5153
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (G1002231)
pubs.funder-project-idMEDICAL RESEARCH COUNCIL (G0001354)
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:56:32 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International