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dc.contributor.authorBrown, Helenen
dc.contributor.authorCorder, Kirstenen
dc.contributor.authorAtkin, AJen
dc.contributor.authorVan Sluijs, Estheren
dc.date.accessioned2017-04-12T15:16:54Z
dc.date.available2017-04-12T15:16:54Z
dc.date.issued2017-06en
dc.identifier.issn2211-3355
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/263649
dc.description.abstractLittle is known about the longitudinal association of familial socio-demographic factors, behaviours, attitudes, or home environment with meeting physical activity guidelines. Our objective was to a) describe 4-year change in the prevalence of meeting guidelines, and characteristics of participants across categories of physical activity maintenance, and b) identify familial factors in childhood that are longitudinally associated with meeting guidelines in adolescence. Data on 17 parent- and child-reported family variables and objectively measured physical activity (ActiGraph GT1M) were available from 406 children (10.3 ± 0.3 years, 53.5% female) participating in the SPEEDY study. Average duration of week- and weekend day moderate-to-vigorous physical activity (MVPA, ≥ 2000 cpm) at baseline and follow-up (14.3 ± 0.3 years) were calculated to determine whether participants met 60 min MVPA/day guidelines at each assessment. Descriptives were calculated across four MVPA change categories. Multi-level logistic regression examined the association of baseline familial factors with meeting guidelines at follow-up, adjusting for sex, baseline physical activity, family socio-economic position, and school clustering. At follow-up, 51.5% and 36.1% of adolescents met guidelines on weekdays and weekend days, respectively (baseline: 68.0%, 67.2%). Girls were less likely than boys to remain sufficiently active, particularly on weekdays. Family social support was positively associated with adolescents meeting guidelines at weekends (OR 1.2; 95% CI 1.0-1.4). The presence of play equipment at home was negatively associated with meeting guidelines on weekdays (OR 0.5; 95% CI 0.3-0.8). Interventions that foster parent's facilitation of physical activity may help to encourage the upkeep of healthy behaviours during the transition from childhood to adolescence.
dc.description.sponsorshipThe SPEEDY study is funded by the National Prevention Research Initiative (G0501294) (http://www.npri.org.uk), consisting of the following Funding Partners: British Heart Foundation; Cancer Research UK; Department of Health; Diabetes UK; Economic and Social Research Council; Medical Research Council; Health and Social Care Research and Development Office for the Northern Ireland; Chief Scientist Office, Scottish Government Health Directorates; Welsh Assembly Government and World Cancer Research Fund. The work was also undertaken under the auspices of the Centre for Diet and Activity Research (CEDAR), a UKCRC Public Health Research Centre of Excellence which is funded by the British Heart Foundation, Cancer Research UK, Economic and Social Research Council, Medical Research Council, the National Institute for Health Research, and the Wellcome Trust. Kirsten Corder reports receiving the following grants: Lead Applicant - A cluster randomised controlled trial to evaluate the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of the GoActive programme to increase physical activity among 13–14 year-old adolescents. Project: 13/90/18 National Institute for Health Research Public Health Research Programme Sept 2015 – Feb 2019. Co-Applicant - Opportunities within the school environment to shift the distribution of activity intensity in adolescents. Department of Health Policy Research Programme. Dec 2013 – Nov 2016. Kirsten Corder is a Director of Ridgepoint Consulting Limited, an operational improvement consultancy.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherElsevier
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivatives 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
dc.subjectFamilyen
dc.subjectHome environmenten
dc.subjectLongitudinalen
dc.subjectMaintenanceen
dc.subjectPhysical activityen
dc.subjectPredictorsen
dc.titleChildhood predictors of adolescent behaviour: The prospective association of familial factors with meeting physical activity guidelinesen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage227
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNamePreventive Medicine Reportsen
prism.startingPage221
prism.volume6en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.9007
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-03-20en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1016/j.pmedr.2017.03.012en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-06en
dc.contributor.orcidBrown, Helen [0000-0001-6162-1474]
dc.contributor.orcidCorder, Kirsten [0000-0002-2744-3501]
dc.contributor.orcidVan Sluijs, Esther [0000-0001-9141-9082]
dc.identifier.eissn2211-3355
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/K023187/1)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (087636/Z/08/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idESRC (ES/G007462/1)
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MC_UU_12015/7)
pubs.funder-project-idDepartment of Health (via National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)) (PHR/15/01/19)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G0501294)
cam.issuedOnline2017-03-23en
dc.identifier.urlhttps://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S2211335517300542?via%3Dihub#!en
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:56:32 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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