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dc.contributor.authorDoñamayor, Nen
dc.contributor.authorStrelchuk, Den
dc.contributor.authorBaek, Ken
dc.contributor.authorBanca, Pen
dc.contributor.authorVoon, Valerieen
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-08T09:40:47Z
dc.date.available2017-05-08T09:40:47Z
dc.identifier.issn1355-6215
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/264130
dc.description.abstractBinge drinking represents a public health issue and is a known risk factor in the development of alcohol use disorders. Previous studies have shown behavioural as well as neuroanatomical alterations associated with binge drinking. Here, we address the question of the automaticity or involuntary nature of the behaviour by assessing goal-directed behaviour and intentionality. In this study, we used a computational two-step task, designed to discern between model-based/goal-directed and model-free/habitual behaviours, and the classic Libet clock task, to study intention awareness, in a sample of 31 severe binge drinkers (BD) and 35 matched healthy volunteers. We observed that BD had impaired goal-directed behaviour in the two-step task compared with healthy volunteers. In the Libet clock task, BD showed delayed intention awareness. Further, we demonstrated that alcohol use severity, as reflected by the alcohol use disorders identification test, correlated with decreased conscious awareness of volitional intention in BD, although it was unrelated to performance on the two-step task. However, the time elapsed since the last drinking binge influenced the model-free scores, with BD showing less habitual behaviour after longer abstinence. Our findings suggest that the implementation of goal-directed strategies and the awareness of volitional intention are affected in current heavy alcohol users. However, the modulation of these impairments by alcohol use severity and abstinence suggests a state effect of alcohol use in these measures and that top-down volitional control might be ameliorated with alcohol use cessation.
dc.description.sponsorshipN.D. is a research fellow of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (DO1915/1-1). This study was funded by the Wellcome Trust as part of a Wellcome Trust Intermediate Fellowship to V.V. (983705/Z/10/Z). V.V. is funded by a Medical Research Council Senior Fellowship (MR/P008747/1).
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectalcohol dependenceen
dc.subjectbinge drinkingen
dc.subjectgoal-directed behaviouren
dc.subjecthabitual behaviouren
dc.subjectintention awarenessen
dc.titleThe involuntary nature of binge drinking: goal directedness and awareness of intentionen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationNameAddiction Biologyen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.9492
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-02-22en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/adb.12505en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-02-22en
dc.identifier.eissn1369-1600
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/P008747/1)
cam.issuedOnline2017-04-16en
cam.orpheus.successThu Jan 30 12:53:35 GMT 2020 - The item has an open VoR version.*
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2100-01-01


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International