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dc.contributor.authorGimeno, TEen
dc.contributor.authorOgée, Jen
dc.contributor.authorEvans, Jessicaen
dc.contributor.authorGibon, Yen
dc.contributor.authorWest, JBen
dc.contributor.authorBurlett, Ren
dc.contributor.authorJones, SPen
dc.contributor.authorSauze, Jen
dc.contributor.authorWohl, Sen
dc.contributor.authorBenard, Cen
dc.contributor.authorGenty, Ben
dc.contributor.authorWingate, Len
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-25T12:09:20Z
dc.date.available2017-05-25T12:09:20Z
dc.date.issued2017-05-03en
dc.identifier.issn0028-646X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/264426
dc.description.abstractCarbonyl sulphide (COS) is a potential tracer of gross primary productivity (GPP), assuming a unidirectional COS flux into the vegetation that scales with GPP. However, carbonic anhydrase (CA), the enzyme that hydrolyses COS, is expected to be light independent, and thus plants without stomata should continue to take up COS in the dark. We measured net CO2 (A(C) ) and COS (A(S) ) uptake rates from two astomatous bryophytes at different relative water contents (RWCs), COS concentrations, temperatures and light intensities. We found large A(S) in the dark, indicating that CA activity continues without photosynthesis. More surprisingly, we found a nonzero COS compensation point in light and dark conditions, indicating a temperature-driven COS source with a Q10 (fractional change for a 10°C temperature increase) of 3.7. This resulted in greater A(S) in the dark than in the light at similar RWC. The processes underlying such COS emissions remain unknown. Our results suggest that ecosystems dominated by bryophytes might be strong atmospheric sinks of COS at night and weaker sinks or even sources of COS during daytime. Biotic COS production in bryophytes could result from symbiotic fungal and bacterial partners that could also be found on vascular plants.
dc.description.sponsorshipFunding was provided by the European Research Council (ERC) early career starting grant SOLCA (grant no. 338264) and the French Agence National de la Recherche (ANR) project ORCA. T.E.G. was funded by the IdEx post-doctoral programme of the Université de Bordeaux and by a Marie Skłodowska-Curie Intra-European fellowship (grant no. 653223). J.R. was funded by NERC grant NE/M00113X/1.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectMarchantia polymorphaen
dc.subjectScleropodium purumen
dc.subjectcarbohydratesen
dc.subjectdesiccationen
dc.subjectliverworten
dc.subjectmossen
dc.subjectproteinen
dc.subjectrespirationen
dc.titleBryophyte gas-exchange dynamics along varying hydration status reveal a significant carbonyl sulphide (COS) sink in the dark and COS source in the lighten
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameNew Phytologisten
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.9774
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-03-21en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/nph.14584en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-05-03en
dc.contributor.orcidEvans, Jessica [0000-0003-0489-6863]
dc.identifier.eissn1469-8137
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
rioxxterms.freetoread.startdate2018-05-03


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International