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dc.contributor.authorWalker, Sen
dc.contributor.authorGibbins, Jen
dc.contributor.authorPaes, Pen
dc.contributor.authorBarclay, Stephenen
dc.contributor.authorAdams, Aen
dc.contributor.authorChandratilake, Men
dc.contributor.authorGishen, Fen
dc.contributor.authorLodge, Pen
dc.contributor.authorWee, Ben
dc.date.accessioned2017-06-12T09:08:40Z
dc.date.available2017-06-12T09:08:40Z
dc.date.issued2017-04-21en
dc.identifier.issn2045-435X
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/264711
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Effective training at medical school is essential to prepare new doctors to safely manage patients with palliative care (PC) and end of life care (EOLC) needs. The contribution of undergraduate PC course organisers is central but their collective views regarding role are unknown. OBJECTIVE: To survey attitudes of PC course organisers regarding their course, organisation, the adequacy of training provided and level of personal satisfaction. METHODS: An anonymised, multifactorial, web-based questionnaire was devised, tested, modified and then sent to lead PC course organisers at all UK medical schools. RESULTS: Data were obtained from all 30 UK medical schools. Organisers agreed/strongly agreed (=agreed) that their PC course was highly rated by students (26, 87%). 25 (83%) agreed their course 'enabled misconceptions and fears about PC, death, dying and bereavement to be addressed', 'delivered quality PC training' (23, 77%), 'fulfilled General Medical Council requirements' (19, 63%), 'prepared students well to care for patients with PC/EOLC needs' (18, 60%) and 'enabled students to visit a hospice and see the role of doctors in caring for the dying' (17, 57%). Concerns were limited capacity to accommodate students (agreed 20, 66%) and variability in teaching according to location (15, 50%). Most agreed their institution recognised PC training as important (22, 73%), they felt supported by colleagues (21, 70%) and experienced cooperation between stakeholders (20, 67%). All agreed that PC training was essential for undergraduates, while 29 (97%) supported inclusion of a hospice visit in the curriculum. 27 agreed that their role was satisfying (90%), 3 disagreed (10%). CONCLUSIONS: Approximately two-thirds of organisers were generally positive about their PC course, institution and role. A minority expressed concerns; these may reflect suboptimal PC training at their medical school and poor preparation of new doctors.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherBMJ Publishing Group
dc.subjectCommunicationen
dc.subjectEducation and trainingen
dc.subjectMethodological researchen
dc.subjectSupportive careen
dc.subjectTerminal careen
dc.titlePreparing future doctors for palliative care: views of course organisersen
dc.typeArticle
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNameBMJ Supportive and Palliative Careen
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.10012
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-04-05en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1136/bmjspcare-2017-001319en
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-04-21en
dc.contributor.orcidBarclay, Stephen [0000-0002-4505-7743]
dc.identifier.eissn2045-4368
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen


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