Show simple item record

dc.contributor.authorDavenport, Romolaen
dc.contributor.authorSchwarz, Len
dc.contributor.authorBoulton, Jen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T12:16:19Z
dc.date.available2017-08-11T12:16:19Z
dc.identifier.issn0013-0117
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/266279
dc.description.abstractSmallpox was probably the single most lethal disease in eighteenth-century Britain, but was a minor cause of death by the mid-nineteenth century. Although vaccination was crucial to the decline of smallpox, especially in urban areas, from the beginning of the nineteenth century, it remains disputed the extent to which smallpox mortality declined before vaccination. Analysis of age-specific changes in smallpox burials within the large west London parish of St Martin-in-the-Fields revealed a precipitous reduction in adult smallpox risk from the 1770s, and this pattern was duplicated in the east London parish of St Dunstan's. Most adult smallpox victims were rural migrants, and such a drop in their susceptibility is consistent with a sudden increase in exposure to smallpox in rural areas. We investigated whether this was due to the spread of inoculation, or an increase in smallpox transmission, using changes in the age patterns of child smallpox burials. Smallpox mortality rose among infants, and smallpox burials became concentrated at the youngest ages, suggesting a sudden increase in infectiousness of the smallpox virus. Such a change intensified the process of smallpox endemicization in the English population, but also made cities substantially safer for young adult migrants.
dc.description.sponsorshipWe would like to thank the Wellcome Trust, Award no. 081508, for funding the research on St Martin-in-the-Fields ... Romola Davenport was partially funded by a Wellcome strategic award, ‘Generation to Reproduction’.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWiley
dc.subjectanthropology, culturalen
dc.subjectdisease transmission, infectiousen
dc.subjecthistory, 18th centuryen
dc.subjecthistory, 19th centuryen
dc.subjecthumansen
dc.subjectLondonen
dc.subjectmortalityen
dc.subjectpopulation groupsen
dc.subjectpreventive health servicesen
dc.subjectpublic healthen
dc.subjectsmallpoxen
dc.subjectsmallpox vaccineen
dc.titleThe decline of adult smallpox in eighteenth-century London.en
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage1314
prism.issueIdentifier4en
prism.publicationNameEconomic History Reviewen
prism.startingPage1289
prism.volume64en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.9716
dcterms.dateAccepted2010-12-15en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1111/j.1468-0289.2011.00599.xen
rioxxterms.versionAMen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://www.rioxx.net/licenses/all-rights-reserveden
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2010-12-15en
dc.contributor.orcidDavenport, Romola [0000-0002-6828-9846]
dc.identifier.eissn1468-0289
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
cam.issuedOnline2011-07-18en


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record