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dc.contributor.authorPassamonti, Lucaen
dc.contributor.authorLuijten, Men
dc.contributor.authorZiauddeen, Hishamen
dc.contributor.authorCoyle-Gilchrist, ITSen
dc.contributor.authorRittman, Timothyen
dc.contributor.authorBrain, SAEen
dc.contributor.authorRegenthal, Ren
dc.contributor.authorFranken, IHAen
dc.contributor.authorSahakian, Barbaraen
dc.contributor.authorBullmore, Edwarden
dc.contributor.authorRobbins, Trevoren
dc.contributor.authorErsche, Karenen
dc.date.accessioned2017-08-11T13:52:49Z
dc.date.available2017-08-11T13:52:49Z
dc.date.issued2017-08-01en
dc.identifier.issn0033-3158
dc.identifier.urihttps://www.repository.cam.ac.uk/handle/1810/266292
dc.description.abstract$\textit{Rationale:}$ Biased attention towards drug-related cues and reduced inhibitory control over the regulation of drug-intake characterize drug addiction. The noradrenaline system has been critically implicated in both attentional and response inhibitory processes and is directly affected by drugs such as cocaine. $\textit{Objectives:}$ We examined the potentially beneficial effects of the noradrenaline reuptake inhibitor atomoxetine in improving cognitive control during two tasks that used cocaine- and non-cocaine-related stimuli. $\textit{Methods:}$ A double-blind, placebo-controlled, and cross-over psycho-pharmacological design was employed. A single oral dose of atomoxetine (40 mg) was administered to 28 cocaine-dependent individuals (CDIs) and 28 healthy controls. All participants performed a pictorial attentional bias task involving both cocaine- and non-cocaine-related pictures as well as a verbal go/no-go task composed of cocaine- and food-related words. $\textit{Results:}$ As expected, CDIs showed attentional bias to cocaine-related cues whilst controls did not. More importantly, however, atomoxetine, relative to placebo, significantly attenuated attentional bias in CDIs ($F_{26}$ = 6.73, $P$ = 0.01). During the go/no-go task, there was a treatment × trial × group interaction, although this finding only showed a trend towards statistical significance ($F_{26}$ = 3.38, $P$ = 0.07). $\textit{Conclusions:}$ Our findings suggest that atomoxetine reduces attentional bias to drug-related cues in CDIs. This may result from atomoxetine's modulation of the balance between tonic/phasic activity in the locus coeruleus and the possibly parallel enhancement of noradrenergic neurotransmission within the prefrontal cortex. Studying how cognitive enhancers such as atomoxetine influence key neurocognitive indices in cocaine addiction may help to develop reliable biomarkers for patient stratification in future clinical trials.
dc.description.sponsorshipThis work was funded by a grant of the Medical Research Council (MR/J012084/1) to TWR, KDE, ETB, and BJS and conducted within the Behavioural and Clinical Neuroscience Institute at the University of Cambridge, which is jointly funded by the Medical Research Council and the Wellcome Trust. This study was jointly sponsored by the Cambridge University Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust and the University of Cambridge.
dc.languageengen
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherSpringer
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 Internationalen
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
dc.subjectatomoxetineen
dc.subjectattentional biasen
dc.subjectcocaine addictionen
dc.subjectnoradrenalineen
dc.subjectresponse inhibitionen
dc.titleAtomoxetine effects on attentional bias to drug-related cues in cocaine dependent individualsen
dc.typeArticle
prism.endingPage2297
prism.issueIdentifier15en
prism.publicationDate2017en
prism.publicationNamePsychopharmacologyen
prism.startingPage2289
prism.volume234en
dc.identifier.doi10.17863/CAM.12554
dcterms.dateAccepted2017-05-11en
rioxxterms.versionofrecord10.1007/s00213-017-4643-4en
rioxxterms.versionVoRen
rioxxterms.licenseref.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/en
rioxxterms.licenseref.startdate2017-08-01en
dc.contributor.orcidPassamonti, Luca [0000-0002-7937-0615]
dc.contributor.orcidZiauddeen, Hisham [0000-0003-4044-1719]
dc.contributor.orcidRittman, Timothy [0000-0003-1063-6937]
dc.contributor.orcidSahakian, Barbara [0000-0001-7352-1745]
dc.contributor.orcidBullmore, Edward [0000-0002-8955-8283]
dc.contributor.orcidRobbins, Trevor [0000-0003-0642-5977]
dc.contributor.orcidErsche, Karen [0000-0002-3203-1878]
dc.identifier.eissn1432-2072
rioxxterms.typeJournal Article/Reviewen
pubs.funder-project-idMRC (MR/J012084/1)
pubs.funder-project-idWellcome Trust (093875/Z/10/Z)
pubs.funder-project-idMedical Research Council (G1100464)
cam.issuedOnline2017-05-27en


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Attribution 4.0 International
Except where otherwise noted, this item's licence is described as Attribution 4.0 International